Vanishing Deductions

Money-Saving Tips

Beginning with the 2019 tax season, filing income-tax returns will no longer be “business as usual.” Some people may be happy to see their 2018 tax return streamlined and receive a higher refund to boot. However, others may lament lost deductions that had previously helped reduce their tax liability.1

The good news is that the standardized deduction will nearly double. Individual filers will receive a $12,000 deduction while married couples will get $24,000. However, in exchange for the simplicity, many itemized deductions will go away. The following are some of the more common ones.2

  • Dependent exemption — Taxpayers will no longer be able to subtract $4,050 from their taxable income for each dependent they claim. The newly doubled $2,000 child credit may help offset the loss of that deduction for some, but not for those whose children are in college.
  • SALT — Deductions for state and local taxes (SALT) will be capped at $10,000. This will mostly affect those who live in areas with high property tax areas, such as in South Florida, New York and
  • Mortgage interest deduction — Deductible interest will be capped for new mortgages valued at $750,000, down from $1 million.
  • Miscellaneous itemized deductions — Expenses such as unreimbursed employee-education expenses, tax-preparation services, investment fees and professional dues, among others, are no longer deductible.
  • Moving expenses — This deduction is completely eliminated for everyone except members of the armed forces.
  • Natural disasters — In the past, expenses not reimbursed by insurance or other relief programs could be deducted on your tax return. Now this deduction is available only to taxpayers in a presidentially designated disaster zone, typically made on a county-by-county basis.
  • Alimony — These payments are no longer deductible from federal taxes for any divorce that is executed after Dec. 31, 2018. However, there is no change in the tax treatment of alimony payments for divorces finalized before 2019.3

The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. Neither our firm nor its agents or representatives may give tax advice. Be sure to speak with a qualified professional about your unique situation.

1 Maryalene LaPonsie. US News & World Report. Feb. 9, 2018. “10 Tax Deductions That Will Disappear Next Year.” https://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/taxes/articles/2018-02-09/10-tax-deductions-that-will-disappear-next-year. Accessed May 29, 2018.

Ibid.

3 Bill Bischoff. Marketwatch. Jan. 26, 2018. “New tax law eliminates alimony deductions — but not for everybody.” https://www.marketwatch.com/story/new-tax-law-eliminates-alimony-deductions-but-not-for-everybody-2018-01-23. Accessed May 29, 2018.

Deducting Home-Loan Interest

Planning Tip

The new tax law still allows a deduction for interest on a home equity loan, line of credit or second mortgage as long as the loan is used to buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayer’s primary or second home. Specifically, the interest is deductible only if the loan meets all three of the following criteria:1

  • The debt is secured by the underlying residence
  • The total of the refinanced debt is not greater than the cost of the residence
  • The proceeds are used to improve or expand the residence

However, the applicable loan is subject to a new $750,000 debt limit ($375,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return). This limit applies to the combined total of loans used to buy, build or improve the taxpayer’s main home and second home. If you have an existing home equity loan that does not qualify under these three criteria, the interest may no longer be deducted.2

 The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. Neither our firm nor its agents or representatives may give tax advice. Be sure to speak with a qualified professional about your unique situation.

 1 IRS. Feb. 21, 2018. “Interest on Home Equity Loans Often Still Deductible Under New Law.” https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/interest-on-home-equity-loans-often-still-deductible-under-new-law. Accessed May 29, 2018.

2 Ibid.  

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Filing Your 2018 Tax Return

Next year, taxes must be filed on or before April 15, 2019. For the last few years, that iconic date was extended because it fell on a legal holiday or a weekend, but it lands on a Monday in 2019.1 While there’s been significant debate regarding how the new tax law will affect Americans across the income scale, we should then have a better idea of how we may be personally impacted by the changes.

Highlights of the new tax law include:2

  • Lower individual tax rates
  • Increased standard deduction ($12,000 single; $24,000 married filing jointly)
  • Increased child tax credit ($2,000)
  • Elimination of dependent and personal exemptions
  • Elimination of some itemized deductions
  • $10,000 cap on the combined deduction for state income taxes, sales and local taxes, and property taxes
  • 20 percent deduction for “pass-through” entities (e.g., sole proprietorship, partnership, S corps)

In light of these changes, it’s a good idea to conduct a midyear review to see if there are ways to take advantage of the new changes or discover any potentially negative situations. If you’re not sure how you might be affected, consult with a tax professional. It may be worth reviewing your 2017 return to consider what new rules may affect your unique situation.

The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. Neither our firm nor its agents or representatives may give tax advice. Be sure to speak with a qualified professional about your unique situation.

1 TimeAndDate.com. April 24, 2018. “Tax Day in the United States.” https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/tax-day. Accessed May 29, 2018.

2 TurboTax. April 24, 2018. “How Will Tax Reform Affect My Refund Next Year?” https://blog.turbotax.intuit.com/tax-reform/how-will-tax-reform-affect-my-refund-next-year-33055/. Accessed May 29, 2018.