Tips for Bargain Hunters

For many of us, retirement means living on a fixed income, and that often means making a budget and watching expenses. One way to help stay on budget is to shop for the best prices on items that fall within our discretionary income budget.

According to Consumer Reports, even though consumers can now buy just about anything they want online at any time of the year, deep discounts for many products still tend to be seasonal.1 For example, the best time to buy summer clothes is halfway through the summer, when stores cut prices to move inventory and make room for the next season’s stock.2

The following list from Consumer Reports details the best months for buying certain consumer items.3

  • January — bathroom scales, ellipticals, linens and sheets, treadmills, TVs, winter sports gear and clothing
  • February — humidifiers, mattresses, winter sports gear and coats
  • March — boxed chocolates, digital cameras, ellipticals, humidifiers and treadmills
  • April — carpet, desktop and laptop computers and digital cameras
  • May — baby high chairs, desktop and laptop computers, interior and exterior paints, mattresses, strollers and wood stains
  • June — camcorders, ellipticals, indoor furniture, summer sports gear and treadmills
  • July — camcorders, decking, exterior and interior paint, siding, summer clothing and wood stains
  • August — air conditioners, backpacks and back-to-school goods, dehumidifiers, outdoor furniture and snow blowers
  • September — desktop and laptop computers, digital cameras, interior and exterior paint, lawn mowers and tractors, printers and snow blowers
  • October — desktop computers, digital cameras, gas grills, lawn mowers and tractors
  • November — camcorders, gas grills, GPS and TVs
  • December — Blu-Ray players, camcorders, e-book readers, gas grills, GPS, headphones, kitchen cookware, major appliances and TVs

According to US News & World Report, the best time to buy a car is not when you see all those ads on TV for Presidents Day, etc. Rather, the best months to shop for good deals are May, October, November and December. The best days to shop are Mondays, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.4

When it comes to holiday gift giving, some of the spoils go to those who procrastinate. If your gift list doesn’t include popular items that will sell out, waiting until the last 10 days before Christmas frequently can net the highest savings. Looking for holiday lights and decorations? The best time to shop is just after the big day, when you can stock up for next year at clearance prices.5

If you’re in the market to buy or sell a house, note that the best time for sellers to list a home is in May, when the supply of houses is tight, thus commanding the highest prices. The best time to buy is at summer’s end, when sellers are cutting house prices that have been on the market for several months.6

As for where to find the best bargains, you’re probably already familiar with local discount stores and volume warehouses. If you’re a member of Amazon Prime, be on the lookout for “Prime Day” each year when the online retailer drastically reduces prices on select items for 24 hours for Prime members. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, “Prime Day” is the time to join because the annual membership fee is usually reduced as well.7

Of course, one of the best ways to stay on budget during retirement is to help ensure your income is ongoing and reliable, which is something we can help with. Give us a call so we can talk about how we can help you create strategies using a variety of insurance products to help you work toward your retirement income goals.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Consumer Reports. “Best Time to Buy Things.” http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/money/best-time-to-buy-things/index.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

2 Nikki Willhite. All Things Frugal. “Shopping the Seasonal Sales.” http://www.allthingsfrugal.com/s_sale.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

3 Consumer Reports. “Best Time to Buy Things.” http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/money/best-time-to-buy-things/index.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

4 Eric C. Evarts. US News & World Report. March 31, 2017. “6 Best Times to Buy a Car.” https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/6-best-times-to-buy-a-car. Accessed June 22, 2017.

5 Denise Groene. The Wichita Eagle. June 16, 2017. “When is the best time to buy a grill, and other stuff.” http://www.kansas.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/article156570289.html. Accessed June 22, 2017.

6 Susie Gharib. Fortune. June 21, 2017. “Do’s and Don’ts for Buying and Selling a House.” http://fortune.com/2017/06/21/zillow-tips-for-buying-and-selling-a-house/. Accessed June 22, 2017.

7 Matt Swider. TechRadar. June 28, 2017. “Amazon Prime Day deals 2017 in the US: Find the best sales for July 11.” http://www.techradar.com/news/amazon-prime-day-2017-usa-when-is-it-and-how-can-you-find-the-best-deals. Accessed June 30, 2017.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products including annuities are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

AE07175084B

Divorce During Retirement

A funny thing happens when you get busy with trying to achieve all the things you want out of life: You lose a few along the way. Unfortunately, some people lose their marriage.1 However, for those who are truly unhappy and can’t see a way back to blissful partnership, a “gray divorce” isn’t necessarily all negative. Even in retirement, leaving a spouse can open up new avenues to be explored, the chance to pursue activities perhaps not supported before and new opportunities to reinvent yourself.

With that said, you also must deal with a myriad of details when it comes to dividing assets to help ensure each ex-spouse has enough income to live comfortably during retirement. Just as it takes a village to raise children, it can take a team of experienced and qualified professionals to help you do this, from attorneys to financial advisors to tax planners and perhaps even a therapist. The goal is to emerge confident about your financial future, and we’re here to help both spouses on this journey should you need it.

When it comes to Social Security, there are certain rules that apply to benefits for a divorced spouse based on the ex’s earning history. For example, the marriage must have lasted for at least 10 years, the couple must be divorced for at least two years and the claiming ex must be currently unmarried – if the claimer gets remarried, the ex’s spousal benefits will stop. Furthermore, the ex-spouses must both be at least age 62 to begin drawing spousal benefits, and the spouse/divorcee must be full retirement age to be eligible for the full spousal benefit.2

Another important component to address is life insurance. If there are alimony payments involved, life insurance can help cover the loss of that income should the payer die first. Depending on their circumstances, divorcing couples may want to update their named beneficiaries on their respective policies. If a policy has a cash value, that money belongs to the owner. While the policy is active, the owner may forgo the death benefit and instead take the cash value, a process known as cashing out your life insurance policy.3

Research has found that divorce may be a reason why many people are working long past traditional retirement age.4 Because of this, it’s important to set aside animosity and work on an equitable agreement for both spouses’ retirement. Divorcing spouses should be cognizant that if one ends up struggling financially, their adult children may have to pick up the slack.5

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Linda Melone. Next Avenue. July 11, 2016. “Why Couples Divorce After Decades of Marriage.” http://www.nextavenue.org/slideshow/why-couples-divorce-after-decades-of-marriage/. Accessed June 6, 2017.

2 Social Security Administration. “Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced.” https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/divspouse.html. Accessed June 6, 2017.

3 Greg DePersio. Investopedia. Nov. 25, 2015. “How Life Insurance Works in a Divorce.” http://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/112515/how-life-insurance-works-divorce.asp. Accessed June 6, 2017.

4 Ben Steverman. Bloomberg. Oct. 17, 2016. “Divorce Is Destroying Retirement.” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-17/divorce-is-destroying-retirement. Accessed June 6, 2017.

5 Charlotte Cowles. The Cut. May 12, 2017. “My Mom Is Broke. How Can I Help Her?” https://www.thecut.com/2017/05/my-mom-is-bad-with-money-how-do-i-help-her.html. Accessed June 6, 2017.

Our firm is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any governmental agency and does not provide tax or legal advice.

Life insurance policies are contracts between you and an insurance company. Life insurance product guarantees rely on the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

AE06175073C

Keeping Connected With the Ever-Changing Internet

If you’ve watched national news in the past year or two, you’ve likely heard debates about net neutrality, which is the principle that internet providers should allow access to content regardless of the source and without blocking certain sites.

In the waning days of the Obama administration, the Federal Communications Commission passed a rule preventing providers such as Comcast and AT&T to monitor each person’s internet browsing history and sell that information to other marketers without their expressed permission.1 Under the Trump administration, Congress has since reversed that ruling.2

This debate is important for both internet users and companies for vastly different reasons. Regardless of the direction this issue takes moving forward, the internet will continue to be an influence in the way we obtain and share information in the future.

As a result, privacy and security concerns are critical, especially with regard to our financial accounts and transactions. The ransomware attack “WannaCryptor,” which affected Great Britain and other countries in May, was an unpleasant reminder of how important it is to keep software programs current by installing updates as they are made available.3

As financial professionals, our priority is keeping a close eye on your finances to help ensure you’re utilizing the optimal products and strategies to work toward your goals. Now more than ever, this requires monitoring the latest technology, because as the world changes, your needs may change with it.

One shift in the tech world is the continued emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT). Companies are projected to spend upward of $5 trillion on the IoT during the next five years.4 These “things” include a wide range of products and services, from “dashboards” – which are information displays that enable users to conduct a multitude of internet transactions via one control center – to “remotes” such as smartphones and connected TVs.5

An interesting component of the IoT is that the more applications are developed, the more vulnerability users are exposed to for security risks.6 From the perspective of a user, whether that’s an individual or a company deploying an enterprise-wide software program, this may pose a financial threat.

However, from an investor’s perspective, the IoT offers a wide variety of opportunities, such as companies that develop sophisticated internet software and others that specialize in IoT safeguard technology.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Federal Register. Dec. 2, 2016. “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/12/02/2016-28006/protecting-the-privacy-of-customers-of-broadband-and-other-telecommunications-services. Accessed May 19, 2017.

2 Tali Arbel. Associated Press. March 29, 2017. “AP Explains: What the death of broadband privacy rules means.” https://apnews.com/957a0429fbac445b8639f983910be689/ap-explains-what-death-broadband-privacy-rules-means. Accessed May 19, 2017.

3 Josephine Wolff. Slate. May 12, 2017. “The Malware Attacking the U.K.’s National Health Service Could’ve Been Stopped. Here’s Why It Wasn’t.” http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2017/05/12/the_malware_attacking_the_nhs_could_ve_been_stopped_here_s_why_it_wasn_t.html. Accessed May 19, 2017.

4 Peter Newman. Business Insider. Jan. 12, 2017. “The Internet of Things 2017 Report: How the IoT is improving lives to transform the world.” http://www.businessinsider.com/the-internet-of-things-2017-report-2017-1. Accessed May 19, 2017.

5 Andrew Meola. Business Insider. Dec. 19, 2016. “What is the Internet of Things (IoT)?” http://www.businessinsider.com/what-is-the-internet-of-things-definition-2016-8?IR=T. Accessed May 19, 2017.

6 Christie Terrill. Forbes. May 16, 2017. “What You Need to Know about Cybersecurity and The Internet of Things.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/christieterrill/2017/05/16/what-you-need-to-know-about-cybersecurity-and-the-internet-of-things/print/. Accessed May 19, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

AE06175069C

The Psychological Impact of a Divisive Election

Before 2016, the American Psychological Association’s (APA) annual Stress in America surveys showed money, work and the economy were the biggest sources of stress in people’s lives.1 During the 2016 presidential campaign season, however, doctors began reporting patients were increasingly anxious due to issues candidates highlighted in speeches and interviews. 2

 The APA’s most recent survey discovered top stressors now include personal safety and the threat of terrorism. The survey also found more than half of Americans reported the presidential election itself was a significant source of stress.3

This is hardly welcome news, considering all the other things we have to be concerned about in life, such as health care, career and finances — and often, those three are intertwined. Many people choose their jobs based on benefits like health insurance, and salary and personal financial confidence are almost always correlated.

The link between health and finances can be challenging during retirement. If you’re having trouble figuring out how to plan for retirement income, including the possibility of increased health care expenses — just give us a call. Some insurance products, such as life insurance and annuities, provide various options you may want to consider. We would be happy to discuss your options based on your unique situation.

Last year’s election even put pressure on some relationships and marriages, particularly when one spouse supported Donald Trump and the other didn’t.4 These types of rifts also were evident on social media sites, with lifelong buddies “unfriending” each other on Facebook when learning the other’s political viewpoints.5 Interestingly, it turns out that getting annoyed and stressed about political posts on social media is a bipartisan issue, equally shared by both Democrats and Republicans.6

One way to stay up to date on current events without the associated political stress is to spend time with people who are disinterested about who lives in the White House. To help retirees figure out where those types of people reside, Bankrate.com conducted an analysis of the most appealing places to live in the U.S. if you’re tired of hearing about politics. The most politics-free states lie in the Great Plains region, ranging from Kansas (lowest cost of living among choices) to North Dakota (lowest per-capita contributions to political campaigns).7

Bankrate.com’s No. 1 pick for a politics-free retirement was Wyoming. In addition to boasting a high degree of overall well-being, the state carries only three electoral votes in presidential elections. That means residents are spared the usual campaign ad blitz that battleground states face.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 American Psychological Association. Feb. 15, 2017. “Stress in America 2017 Snapshot:

Coping with Change.” http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2016/coping-with-change.pdf. Accessed April. 26, 2017.

2 Carey Goldberg. WBUR. Nov. 18, 2016. “Mass. Doctors Are Seeing the Effects of the Election in the Exam Room.” http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2016/11/18/mass-doctors-election-effects. Accessed May 17, 2017.

3 American Psychological Association. Feb. 15, 2017. “Stress in America 2017 Snapshot:

Coping with Change.” http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2016/coping-with-change.pdf. Accessed April. 26, 2017.

4 Sridhar Pappu. New York Times. Aug. 13, 2016. “He Likes Trump. She Doesn’t. Can This Marriage Be Saved?” https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/14/fashion/marriage-politics-donald-trump-hillary-clinton.html. Accessed April 26, 2017.

5 Matt Lindner. Chicago Tribune. Nov. 9, 2016. “Block. Mute. Unfriend. Tensions rise on Facebook After Election Results.” http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-facebook-election-reaction-family-1109-20161109-story.html. Accessed April 26, 2017.

6 Maeve Duggan and Aaron Smith. Pew Research Center. Oct. 25, 2016. “The Political Environment on Social Media.” http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/10/25/the-political-environment-on-social-media/. Accessed April 26, 2017.

7 Jill Cornfield. March 20, 2017. “10 Best States to Retire in if You’re Sick of Politics.” http://www.bankrate.com/retirement/10-best-states-to-retire-in-if-youre-sick-of-politics/#slide=1. Accessed April 26, 2017.

8 Ibid.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 AE05175059B

Simplify Your Life

Life has its highs and lows. Sometimes when we go for a long stretch — everybody in the family is healthy, finances are on track, you’re enjoying yourself — we get that nagging feeling that our good fortune just can’t last. Often, that’s true. There’s inevitably a repair needed on your car, an appliance breaks down or you fall and twist your knee. You deal with it and life just keeps carrying on.

One of the ways to help keep balance in life is through discipline. Establish a fixed fitness routine that you enjoy so that it’s easier to sustain, make plans to visit with friends and family on a regular basis to nurture important relationships and create a retirement income strategy with the goal of providing for you and your family in the future. Just as maintenance is one of the keys to good health, discipline is one of the keys to financial confidence. If you’d like to discuss creating retirement strategies through the use of insurance products that can help you work toward your long-term retirement income goals, please give us a call.

There also are small and easy ways to make our lives simpler. You can find freshly termed “life hacks” while surfing the internet. Some of these ideas are quite ingenious, like the myriad ways to use an office binder clip: cable catcher, razor safety cover, toothpaste tube squeezer, money clip or emergency cuff link. Discover dozens of clever ways to use household objects to make life easier, such as tucking away long electrical cords into empty paper towel rolls, differentiating keys by painting them with colored nail polish and tucking sheet sets into their corresponding pillow cases to keep them together in storage.1

There also are plenty of free online tools designed to help you manage your health, such as an online hearing check.2 There are even ways to help manage arthritis pain without medication, such as using a rubber grip pad to help hold a pen, toothbrush or silverware.3

There will always be good stretches in life and times when it seems like things are going wrong. But one of life’s greatest “hacks” is to find the silver lining in difficult periods. For instance, should you get laid up for a time with nothing to do, look up some of the nifty “life hacks” posted all over the web. You’ll find that a little bit of imagination can go a long way toward maintaining a simpler life.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

 1 CanYouActually.com. 2017. “50 Incredibly Useful Life Hacks You Won’t Believe You Didn’t Know.” http://canyouactually.com/life-hacks/. Accessed March 31, 2017.

2 Action on Hearing Loss. 2017. “Check Your Hearing.” https://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/your-hearing/look-after-your-hearing/check-your-hearing/take-the-check.aspx. Accessed March 31, 2017.

3 Harvard Medical School. 2017. “5 ways to manage arthritis and keep it from slowing you down.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/5-ways-to-keep-arthritis-from-slowing-you-down. Accessed March 31, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

AE04175048B

The Power of Going Green

Here’s a new twist to the renewable energy and save the planet story: The Kentucky Coal Mining Museum in Benham, Kentucky, has recently switched from coal to solar power to help save on operational costs.1

It just goes to show you that the power struggle over power may be better energized by not making it an “either/or” (traditional vs. renewable sources) conflict. Individuals might consider looking at their financial strategy in much the same way. For example, there are financial vehicles retirees traditionally use for income, such as government bonds, Treasury bills, CDs and money market accounts. But given the potential for higher inflation in the future and today’s longer lifespans, there is a greater call for incorporating growth opportunity in a retiree’s financial strategy.

This poses a challenging situation in that more growth potential generally involves more market risk. However, there are alternative options, such as insurance products, that can capture some of the gains of equity markets while protecting your principal from market losses, and we’d be happy to discuss them with you. Like the energy sources debate, a financial strategy may be best served by incorporating a combination of both traditional and alternative solutions.

While recent news for the coal-mining industry indicates a positive turn2, many experts believe that if the U.S. doesn’t continue to make substantial investments in renewable energy sources, we could fall behind in global competition.3 In fact, the global investment in renewable power in 2015 was more than twice that invested in new coal- and natural-gas-fired power generation. China alone represented 36 percent of that total investment.4

Speaking of global efforts, consider some of the ways other parts of the world are going green. For example, German households don’t just separate trash between garbage and recyclables; the average home has five different bins for dispersing paper, packaging, glass, compost and trash.5

And finally, studies in green trends have revealed positive effects on our health, particularly in the health of women. Research by Harvard Medical School found that women who lived among higher levels of green vegetation had lower rates of mortality. The study found that higher exposure to green landscapes was associated with lower levels of depression and increased levels of social engagement and physical activity.6

These factors may have a significant impact on longer lifespans. But it’s also interesting to note the vegetation correlation — plants have been found to remove pollutants, making them natural air filters.7 This may explain why women in the study who were continuously exposed to green environments were less likely to die of a respiratory disease.8 That’s one green benefit that can help you breathe easier.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Fox News. April 6, 2017. “Kentucky Coal Mining Museum Switches to Solar Power.” http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/06/kentucky-coal-mining-museum-switches-to-solar-power.html. Accessed April 8, 2017.

2 John Kemp. Fortune. April 7, 2017. “Look for Coal and Mining Jobs to Come Back This Year” http://fortune.com/2017/04/07/coal-mining-jobs/. Accessed April 8, 2017.

3 Nick Stockton. Wired. March 16, 2017. “Clean Energy Could Spark a Trade War Between the US And China.” https://www.wired.com/2017/03/us-china-clean-energy/. Accessed April 8, 2017.

4 Jeff Nesbit. US News & World Report. March 15, 2017. “Clean Energy Is Seeing Monumental Job Growth.” https://www.usnews.com/news/at-the-edge/articles/2017-03-15/clean-energy-is-seeing-explosive-job-growth-dont-let-budget-kill-it. Accessed April 8, 2017.

5 Perfect Rubber Mulch. 2017. “Recycling Across the Globe.” https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5548ed90e4b0b0a763d0e704/t/58e69d90b8a79bf113147752/1491508625841/TheGlobe_by_GiuMagnani-2.jpg. Accessed April 8, 2017.

6 Elizabeth Pegg Frates, MD. Harvard Medical School. March 9, 2017. “Time Spent in ‘Green’ Places Linked With Longer Life in Women.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/time-spent-green-places-linked-longer-life-women-2017030911152?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=030917&utm_content=blog. Accessed April 8, 2017.

7 Melanie Pinola. Life Hacker. May 20, 2015. “This Graphic Shows the Best Air-Cleaning Plants, According to NASA.” http://lifehacker.com/this-graphic-shows-the-best-air-cleaning-plants-accord-1705307836. Accessed April 13, 2017.

8 Elizabeth Pegg Frates, MD. Harvard Medical School. March 9, 2017. “Time Spent in ‘Green’ Places Linked With Longer Life in Women.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/time-spent-green-places-linked-longer-life-women-2017030911152?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=030917&utm_content=blog. Accessed April 8, 2017.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products including annuities are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurance carrier.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

AE04175044C