Music Plays Instrumental Role in Healing Ailments

Hearing a familiar song from a happy period in your life, such as childhood, can instantly make you feel joyful. It’s as if you’re right back there — toe tapping, head bopping and singing along. Just as with our sight, smell and taste senses, positive auditory memories can enhance mood and transport us back to a happier time.

The power of music has led researchers to study various applications of music therapy to help people overcome the pain of health conditions, emotional challenges and even the cognitive decline that often accompanies old age.1

It’s not enough to believe we will all grow old gracefully. This usually doesn’t happen without planning. A big part of planning for retirement isn’t just how to provide enough income for the rest of our life, but how to help ensure we still enjoy a high quality of life no matter our age.

As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives; just give us a call. As for creating a plan to help enhance quality of life, consider some of these music therapy applications.

Music therapy is now a board-certified health profession. With approximately 7,500 practitioners throughout the country, the practice has become prevalent in nursing homes and hospices. The American Music Therapy Association reports about 10 percent of musical therapists work with terminally ill patients in a new discipline called end-of-life music therapy.2

 A growing body of research indicates music therapy can help improve cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.3 It also can be used to aid in stress and pain management, memory enhancement, communication and physical rehabilitation.4

Further, the discipline has been found to help people with psychiatric problems, such as depression, trauma and schizophrenia. Music can help calm patients as well as help them process emotions, trauma and grief.5

Interestingly, the military has used forms of music therapy since the post-World War I era. Trained musical therapists use it as a tool to help wounded, injured or ill soldiers express their thoughts nonverbally. Research also shows music can be effective at increasing neuroplasticity in the brain, which is an important role in helping veterans address symptoms of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries.6

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Sharon Otterman. The New York Times. Jan. 15, 2018. “Music Therapy Offers an End-of-Life Grace Note.” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/15/nyregion/music-therapy-nursing-home-hospice.html. Accessed April 13, 2018.

2 Ibid.

3 Sherry Christiansen. Alzheimer’s Universe. July 24, 2017. “Quick Alzheimer’s Prevention Pearl: Studies Show Music Improves Cognition in People with Alzheimer’s Disease.” https://www.alzu.org/blog/2017/07/24/how-music-helps-with-alzheimers-prevention/. Accessed April 18, 2018.

4 American Music Therapy Association. 2018. “What is Music Therapy?” https://www.musictherapy.org. Accessed April 13, 2018.

5 Molly Warren. National Alliance on Mental Illness. Dec. 19, 2016. “The Impact of Music Therapy on Mental Health.” https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/December-2016/The-Impact-of-Music-Therapy-on-Mental-Health. Accessed April 18, 2018.

6 Frank Otto. Drexel University News Blog. March 20, 2018. “3 Things to Keep in Mind About Music Therapy in the Military.” https://newsblog.drexel.edu/2018/03/20/3-things-to-keep-in-mind-about-music-therapy-in-the-military/. Accessed April 13, 2018.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Why It’s Important to Care for the Caregivers

If you picture yourself receiving long-term care at some point, you likely envision a medical professional sitting bedside, tending to your needs. However, the bulk of long-term care in the U.S. is actually provided by family caregivers.1

According to a recent Merrill Lynch study, 20 million Americans become caregivers each year. Moreover, family caregivers collectively spend $190 billion a year of their own money on adult care recipients. And the toll doesn’t end there. In addition to 92 percent of caregivers using their own money and/or coordinating or managing finances to aid loved ones:2

  • 98% provide emotional support
  • 92% provide household support
  • 79% provide care coordination
  • 64% provide physical care

Women usually do more caregiving than men, the study found, averaging six years of caregiving in their lifetime compared to four for men. As a result, caregiving can bring more of a financial burden for women because of the time they may need to take away from their careers to care for loved ones.3

The financial burden of caregiving, for both men and women, should not be underestimated. The study shows 53 percent of respondents have made financial sacrifices as caregivers, and 21 percent have dipped into their savings.4

If you’re in a similar situation and are concerned about having enough income in retirement, please contact us. We work with clients to create retirement strategies through the use of insurance products that help them work toward their long-term retirement income goals.

Increasing attention is also being given to the psychosocial burden experienced by family caregivers. The responsibility and stress can contribute to their own physical conditions, including chronic diseases caused by unhealthy eating habits, sleeping poorly and not getting enough physical activity.5

Caregivers have twice the incidence of heart attack, arthritis, heart disease and diabetes compared to non-caregivers. Their chronic stress can even lead to cognitive reduction such as short-term memory loss and attention deficits. To cope with their complex lives, caregivers also may be prone to develop dependence on alcohol, smoking, prescription drugs and psychotropic drugs for mood enhancement. Caregivers also tend to have higher obesity rates.6

To help family members who are caring for a loved one with cancer, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York developed a support program that included webcasts with staged therapeutic interactions between therapists and informal caregivers, and a message board where study participants could post responses to experiential exercise questions. Initial results found that program participants experienced reduced symptoms of depression.7

Technological advances may also help ease caregiving challenges. For example, wearable devices can monitor heart rate and blood pressure, among other vitals. These devices can be linked to mobile phone apps, alerting a caregiver of any changes that might trigger a serious health issue.8

Some wearable devices use GPS and geofencing technologies to track patients, allowing them more mobility while also helping caregivers monitor patients’ locations. Newer devices use artificial intelligence to recognize trends in vital signs or movement that can lead to health or injury concerns.9

Regardless of what innovations the technology industry creates to aid caregivers, there is some comfort in knowing that the primary skills necessary in a caregiver cannot be replicated by artificial intelligence or a robot. Human caregivers not only offer compassion, empathy and the ability to meet retirees’ emotional needs, but these soft skills can be learned and improved — which will prove to be a critical sector of our workforce in years to come.10

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Advisor News. Nov. 1, 2017. “92% Of Caregivers Are Financial Caregivers.” https://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/92-caregivers-financial-caregivers#.WgOptLaZOfU. Accessed Dec. 4, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Ibid.

4 Ibid.

5 Kathy Birkett. Senior Care Corner. “How Are YOU, Family Caregiver — Are You Caring for Yourself?” http://seniorcarecorner.com/family-caregiver-caring-for-yourself. Accessed Dec. 4, 2017.

6 Ibid.

7 Meg Barbor. The ASCO Post. April 25, 2017. “Attrition High but Positive Trends Observed in Web-Based Intervention Addressing Caregiver Burden.” http://www.ascopost.com/issues/april-25-2017/attrition-high-but-positive-trends-observed-in-web-based-intervention-addressing-caregiver-burden/. Accessed Dec. 4, 2017.

8 1-800-HomeCare. Oct. 12, 2017. “What Are the Top Emerging Tech Trends for Home Care In 2017?” https://www.1800homecare.com/homecare/new-tech/. Accessed Dec. 4, 2017.

9 Ibid.

10 Harry Welchel. ChirpyHire. July 31, 2017. “Senior Care and The Future of Work.” http://blog.chirpyhire.com/senior-care-and-the-future-of-work/. Accessed Dec. 4, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Best Places to Live in Retirement

Many retirees believe the best place to live in retirement is right in their own home. Let’s explore some of the “best places” where that home might be located and what it might look like.

It’s worth noting that the retirement experience varies widely. Some people have the money to relocate or buy a second home. Some people have plenty of retirement funds but choose to remain where they are. Come talk to us if you’d like help in creating a retirement income plan to assist you with figuring out what you may be able to afford.

According to a study by U.S. News & World Report on the top states for people 65 and older, Colorado is the best place in America to spend your retirement years. The study evaluated which states are most effective at helping retirees meet their health care, financial and community involvement needs.1

If you have a specific retirement haven in mind, be sure to do some research about it. For health care services, for example, U.S. News publishes a guide to the best hospitals with a searchable database. To learn about a locale’s cost of living, consider the Council for Community and Economic Research’s Cost of Living Index. To get a feel for an area’s year-round climate, check out the interactive climate data tools at the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information.2

Relocating after retirement can be difficult for some people, especially those with close friends and family ties to an area. If this is a concern for you, consider a short-distance move. Perhaps move to a nearby town that has less hustle and bustle, and more outdoor and cultural activities. If your motivation is to downsize, you may even be able to do that in your own community. In this case, you can get rid of the big house and accompanying maintenance chores and expenses, but stay close to family and friends.

Consider where you might be able to access personal help as you age, and the best way to procure that help. For example, you could relocate to a neighborhood near a nursing or medical school, and hire a student to help you if needed. If you have an extra bedroom, consider offering free or low-cost accommodations in exchange for personal aid. Even when we don’t need help with health care needs, as we age it never hurts to have someone we know and trust around to help maintain the house and lawn, drive or run errands, or just check in for conversation.

Think long term – not what your health is like right now, but what it could be like 20 years from now. In other words, having stairs may increase your chances of a fall. They also will be difficult to use if mobility is an issue. For some, the solution may be to buy a single-story home with the idea of avoiding those potential problems.

Another option to consider may be to sell your home and rent a smaller home. This could allow a retiree to pocket equity from the home sale and keep expenses low enough for current income sources. Renting also may eliminate the risk of a large maintenance cost or unanticipated repair.3

These are all long-term considerations people should think about with regard to the “best place to live in retirement.”

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 U.S. News & World Report. “Best States: Aging in America Ranking.” https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/rankings/aging. Accessed Nov. 21, 2017.

2 Melissa Phipps. The Balance. Sept. 4, 2017. “Find out Where You Should Retire.” https://www.thebalance.com/where-should-i-retire-2894254. Accessed Oct. 31, 2017.

3 Eric Petroff. Investopedia. March 17, 2017. “Retirement Living: Renting Vs. Home Ownership.” https://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/07/buy-rent.asp. Accessed Nov. 29, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

A 100-Year Lifespan: Ways to Help Increase Enjoyment

The average life expectancy of a baby born in the U.S. today is 80 years. However, this prediction assumes prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of birth stay the same throughout a person’s life.1

In reality, patterns of mortality improve over time thanks to discoveries and innovations in nutrition and medical science. If you extrapolate the data to represent the same pace of mortality improvement in the future, people up to age 30 today can reasonably expect to live to an average age of 100.2

However, just as important as how long you live is how well you live. Below are some ideas on steps you can take to help ensure you enjoy your retirement years.

One way to prepare for an active retirement is to engage in work-life balance early in life. Many people work long hours and don’t take enough vacation time. Over time, this can lead to mental and physical exhaustion. If we don’t take care of ourselves when we’re younger, we have less chance of enjoying a higher quality of life when we’re older.

Or, consider your perspective – are you pursuing your own happiness or trying to find meaning in life? Studies have demonstrated that the pursuit of happiness may not be as good for our well-being as the pursuit of a more meaningful life. In other words, being directed and motivated by valued life goals, which often can take more effort and cause more stress, may be more rewarding. To illustrate, consider the rewards of raising children versus embarking on a series of exotic vacations. Researchers have found that, over the long term, people who pursued more meaning and purpose were more deeply satisfied than those chasing temporary happiness.3

Another study even found a correlation between greater engagement in day-to-day life with a higher degree of financial success, possibly because this type of person tends to place a high value on pursuing long-term goals.4

Exercise is also key. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 32 percent of older adults do not engage in any physical exercise. Understandably, people who don’t prioritize exercise when they’re younger are not likely do so in retirement, so it’s important to make it a habit early on.5

It’s also important to choose activities you can continue as you age. Classes growing in popularity among the over-50 set include dance, strength training, gentle yoga, “gentle stretch,” “Pilates fusion,” ballet barre and tai chi. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, programs for older adults are among the top 20 fitness trends for 2017.6

Retirees may be familiar with the SilverSneakers program, celebrating its 25th anniversary. The program is free for adults over age 65 who are covered by Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplement and many other plans.7

In addition to things you should do to enrich a 100-year life, there are things that would make it less enjoyable. One of those things is dementia. While there are many risk factors for dementia, including age, alcohol use, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and genetics, a recent study discovered a few other common triggers that can increase the risk of cognitive decline:8

  • Taking anticholinergic drugs, which includes over-the-counter sleep aids, sedating allergy meds (e.g., Benadryl), sedating pain meds (e.g., Tylenol PM) and prescription meds such as some antidepressants and urinary incontinence treatments. The study also found that once people stop taking these meds, their risk dropped back to normal levels.
  • Lack of vitamin D
  • Heartburn medications with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as Prilosec and Prevacid (complete list here)

We can help you prepare for longer life expectancies by utilizing insurance products within your overall retirement income strategy. Please feel free to contact us to discuss how we can help.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Peter Vanham. World Economic Forum. Sept. 15, 2016. “You’ll Probably Live to Be 100. Here’s How You Need To Prepare For It.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/09/you-ll-probably-live-to-be-100-here-s-how-you-need-to-prepare-for-it/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Emily Esfahani Smith and Jennifer Aaker. New York Magazine. Dec. 30, 2016. “In 2017, Pursue Meaning Instead of Happiness.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/12/in-2017-pursue-meaning-instead-of-happiness.html. Accessed March 3, 2017.

4 Drake Baer. New York Magazine. Jan. 4, 2017. “Living with Purpose Yields a Longer Life and Higher Income.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/01/living-with-purpose-yields-a-longer-life-and-higher-income.html. Accessed March 3, 2017.

5 Lynn Langway. Next Avenue. Jan. 30, 2017. “Boomers Took Fitness and Made It Their Own.” http://www.nextavenue.org/boomers-fitness-trends/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

6 Ibid.

7 Ibid.

8 Beth Levine. Next Avenue. May 25, 2016. “3 Surprising Things That Raise Your Dementia Risk.” http://www.nextavenue.org/3-surprising-things-raise-dementia-risk/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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The Longevity Revolution

How old do you have to be before you’re considered “old”? This number may change depending on the age of the person making the assessment. For example, a child or a teenager might think someone age 40 is old. That view is less likely to be held by a 39-year-old.

History indicates you have to reach a lot more birthdays these days to be considered old. One way to judge this is to look at pictures of your parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents when they were your age. Apart from the improved clarity of photographs in the modern era, many of us have fewer wrinkles and an overall healthier appearance than our ancestors.1

The data backs this up. A study by a Stanford University economics professor found that back in the 1920s, males were considered old if they were age 55 and up, whereas today that’s considered “middle age.”2

Of course, how we feel can change from day to day. Some days we might feel like a teenager, while other days we feel older than our years. We don’t want our clients to have similar feelings of uncertainty when planning for retirement. First of all, we like to help our clients work toward a well-prepared financial future. Second, it’s important to  consider that no matter how old you are, you’re likely to live longer than your parents and thus should plan for that eventuality. That’s why we work with our clients to create retirement income strategies for a retirement income that lasts as long as they do.

From a societal perspective, some of the reasons we’ve experienced a longevity revolution include universal access to clean water, sanitation, waste removal, electricity and refrigeration, as well as vaccinations and continued improvements in health care.3 At the individual level, people have their own take on why they’re living longer. One woman from Maine, 100-year-old Florence Bearse, claims the secret to her longevity is drinking wine. That, and people shouldn’t “take any baloney” if they want to live to old age.4

Another centenarian, Manhattan jazz saxophonist Fred Staton, is still playing professionally at age 102, which gives credence to the notion that creativity and passion lend themselves to a longer life.5 While a healthy lifestyle might be a strong indicator of longevity, it is by no means a definitive measure. Staton admits to smoking up until age 60, and rocker Mick Jagger — not exactly the poster child for a clean-living lifestyle — is still performing at Rolling Stones concerts at age 73.6

As for saving enough money to live comfortably throughout a long retirement, global analysts have noticed an interesting trend in spending among retirees. In wealthier countries, retirees appear to be aware of the potential for outliving their income, with many saving more than necessary.7

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Steve Vernon. CBS News. June 29, 2017. “What age is considered ‘old’ nowadays?” http://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-age-is-considered-old-nowadays/. Accessed July 8, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Ibid.

4 Time. July 7, 2017. “Secret to 100-Year-Old Woman’s Longevity Likely Wine.” http://time.com/4849191/100-year-old-old-age-secret-wine/. Accessed July 8, 2017.

5 Corey Kilgannon. New York Times. June 29, 2017. “At 102, a ‘Triple-Digit’ Jazzman Plays On.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/29/nyregion/fred-staton-jazz-saxophonist-plays-on.html. Accessed July 8, 2017.

6 The Economist. July 6, 2017. “Getting to grips with longevity.” https://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21724745-ageing-populations-could-be-boon-rather-curse-happen-lot?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/gettingtogripswithlongevity. Accessed July 8, 2017.

7 The Economist. July 6, 2017. “Financing longevity.” https://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21724751-lives-get-longer-financial-models-will-have-change-financing-longevity. Accessed July 8, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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How to Help Avoid Struggling with Caregiver Burnout

Serving as a caregiver for a loved one can be a wonderful thing. It often allows ill or disabled individuals to remain in their own home, surrounded by familiar surroundings. However, it can often take a toll on the person providing care, and can sometimes lead to the caregiver feeling depleted or exhausted. This feeling is commonly known as caregiver burnout.1

The National Alliance for Caregiving reported an estimated 43.5 million adults provided care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged loved one in 2014. The organization also reported the average caregiver spends nearly 25 hours per week providing assistance, the equivalent of a part-time job.2

While being a caregiver can be rewarding, it can also be emotionally, physically and mentally taxing. Burnout tends to happen when the caregiver neglects his or her own needs — often without realizing it’s happening.

If you are providing care for an ill or disabled loved one, it’s important to recognize the symptoms of burnout in the early stages. The ALS Association reports some of these patterns as signs of burnout for caregivers:3

  • Irritability and impatience
  • Overreacting to small things or comments made by others
  • Problems sleeping
  • Abuse of food, tobacco, drugs or alcohol
  • Feelings of isolation, alienation or resentment
  • Increasing levels of stress

The time and money dedicated to helping someone else can also be a drain on the caregiver. While retirees in particular may feel they have the time available to take care of a friend in need, it’s important they consider how that kind of time commitment could affect their own energy levels and financial resources.

How do you avoid caregiver burnout? Here are five suggestions from the Caregiver Action Network:4

  1. Seek support. Providing care can be isolating. Reach out to family and friends, and tell them exactly what you need. Many of them want to help, but they aren’t sure how. Also explore online options. The AARP provides a list of resources for caregivers,5 including online communities where people can share experiences.
  2. Take breaks. Letting someone else provide care can be difficult, since others don’t do things quite the same way and it might be challenging for the person receiving care to adjust to someone new. Taking a break, however, is important for both mental and physical respite.
  3. Don’t neglect your own health. It might take some creativity, but find ways to work in activity, even if it’s taking a 15-minute walk. Pay attention to your own nutrition. Try not to let go of all the things that bolster your mental health; it can be easy to neglect your own hobbies and interests.
  4. Get the paperwork in order. Organize medical records, legal paperwork and other items so they’re easy to find. Introduce yourself to your loved one’s lawyer, accountant, financial professional and other service providers. Provide them with a copy of a power of attorney so you can have access to records if needed. If you have questions about how taking the time to care for someone else could affect you financially, don’t hesitate to reach out to your financial professional.
  5. Don’t be too hard on yourself. Caregiving is a tough job. Recognizing that you also have physical, mental and emotional needs will help you avoid burnout and continue to provide the best care to your loved one.

Content prepared by Amy Ragland.

 1 Senior Helpers. “Caregiver Burnout.” http://www.seniorhelpers.com/resources/family-caregiver-burnout.  Accessed May 21, 2017.

2 National Alliance for Caregiving in Collaboration with AARP. June 2015. Pages 6 and 33. “Caregiving in the U.S. 2015.” http://www.caregiving.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/2015_CaregivingintheUS_Final-Report-June-4_WEB.pdf. Accessed May 21, 2017.

3 ALS Association. “Symptoms of Caregiver Burnout.” http://www.alsa.org/als-care/caregivers/caregivers-month/symptoms-of-caregiver-burnout.html. Accessed May 21, 2017.

4 Caregiver Action Network. “10 Tips for Family Caregivers.” http://caregiveraction.org/resources/10-tips-family-caregivers. Accessed May 21, 2017.

5 AARP. “Resources Caregivers Should Know About.” http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/info-08-2012/important-resources-for-caregivers.html. Accessed May 21, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Preventing Elderly Financial Abuse

A recent study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College concluded that many retirees who do not suffer from any cognitive impairment can still manage their money through their 70s and 80s.1 The study reports that financial capacity relies on accumulated knowledge and that knowledge stays mostly intact as we age.

However, the study points out that it generally is not a good idea to start managing financial decisions in your late 70s and 80s if you haven’t had experience doing this before — such as after the death of a spouse who handled the finances.2 We work closely with our clients to help them develop financial strategies designed to last a lifetime, with the goal of reducing the need to make dramatic financial changes later in life. However, we are here to address any questions or concerns of our clients no matter what stage of their financial planning. Please give us a call; we’re here to help.

Having a plan for late-stage financial management is important due to the increase in elderly financial fraud. With more than 45 million seniors in America, this is a large and tempting market for scammers. One study estimated that about 5 million older Americans are financially exploited each year. In New York state alone, allegations of elderly financial abuse spiked by more than 35 percent between 2010 and 2014.3

In response to this growing problem, several government regulatory agencies have stepped up efforts to help prevent and address elder financial abuse, including the following:

  • The SEC requires brokers to make “reasonable efforts” to identify a “trusted contact” for investment accounts and allows them to prevent the disbursement of funds from the account and notify the trusted contact if the broker suspects abuse.4
  • The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, or FINRA, set up a senior help line at 844-57-HELPS (844-574-3577)5
  • In 2016, four state legislatures approved a rule requiring advisors to notify adult protective services and state regulators if they detect abuse; 10 more states are expected to adopt similar rules this year, and three other states already had such rules in place.6

According to the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse, some of the most common ways the elderly are taken advantage of financially are: forging their signature; getting them to sign a deed, will or power of attorney through deception, coercion or undue influence; using their property or possessions without permission; and telemarketing scams. Some of the most likely perpetrators of elder financial abuse are: family members; predatory people who seek out vulnerable seniors; and unscrupulous business professionals.7 If you believe you are a victim of fraud, contact your local law enforcement, state agency on aging and/or a community senior services group.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Anek Belbase and Geoffrey T. Sanzenbacher. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. January 2017. “Cognitive Aging and the Capacity to Manage Money.” http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/cognitive-aging-and-the-capacity-to-manage-money/. Accessed June 22, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Christine Idzelis. Investment News. April 23, 2017. “Advisers on front lines in battle against financial abuse of the elderly.”  http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FEATURE/170339977. Accessed June 22, 2017.

4 Mark Schoeff Jr. Investment News. April 3, 2017. “Advisers taking steps to protect elderly.” http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FREE/170339979?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social. Accessed June 22, 2017.

5 FINRA. “FINRA Securities Helpline for Seniors.” http://www.finra.org/investors/highlights/finra-securities-helpline-seniors. Accessed June 22, 2017.

6 Mark Schoeff Jr. Investment News. April 3, 2017. “Advisers taking steps to protect elderly.” http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FREE/170339979?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social. Accessed June 22, 2017.

7 National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. “Financial Abuse.” http://www.preventelderabuse.org/elderabuse/fin_abuse.html. Accessed June 22, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Retirement: Loneliness Can Sneak Up on You

Even people who have spent a lot of time planning for retirement may encounter unexpected challenges once they’re in those golden years. They focus on retirement income planning, which is, of course, important and appropriate — and we can help you there. They also focus on things they want to do while they’re still in good health, such as traveling or playing pickleball. They look forward to spending more time with their spouse and good friends.

It can be quite joyful, but the less joyful realization often sets in when a spouse or a close friend passes away. That’s when many retirees truly understand they are facing the reality of their mortality. Apart from that, they’ve also lost a best friend and companion.1

Sometimes the pain of loss causes us to want to avoid that pain altogether, which can lead to an unwitting desire to isolate ourselves. Unfortunately, this can be particularly problematic during retirement, when people are less likely to have scheduled daily interaction with others outside the household.

Studies in the U.S. and Britain show the prevalence of loneliness among people older than 60 ranges from 10 percent to 46 percent.2 Additionally, people with low levels of social interaction can experience brain changes that cause them to see other human faces as threatening and, therefore, are less likely to seek social ties.3 It’s all kind of ironic, isn’t it? With so many people experiencing the same malady, you would hope we could find each other, since companionship would certainly help.

One social scientist — Robin Dunbar, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford — summed it up with this observation: “It has become apparent in the last 10 years that the most important factor influencing your health, well-being, risk of falling ill, even your risk of dying and divorce is actually the size of your friend network.” His research shows bonding is strongest when endorphins are released, so he recommends that one way to strengthen friendships is by singing, dancing and working out with others.4

Retirement isolation is being studied from a number of different perspectives, particularly in housing. Although many retirees are reluctant to move to an assisted living facility, the longer they live, the more they will need help. Some have taken to moving into co-housing apartment buildings in which the tenants plan activities and support each other without all the rules and restrictions of a retirement home.5

We’re always happy to get together and chat with you about any retirement income planning questions you might have. Give us a call toll-free at 1-888-272-1099 if we can be of assistance and be sure to spend time with friends and family doing the activities you enjoy.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

 1 National Institute on Aging. July 2016. “Mourning the Death of a Spouse.” https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/mourning-death-spouse. Accessed May 28, 2017.

2 Katie Hafner. The New York Times. Sept. 5, 2016. “Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness.” https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/health/lonliness-aging-health-effects.html?_r=2. Accessed June 13, 2017.

3 Olga Khazan. The Atlantic. April 6, 2017. “How Loneliness Begets Loneliness.” https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/04/how-loneliness-begets-loneliness/521841/.

4 Aylin Woodward. Scientific American. May 1, 2017. “With a Little Help from My Friends.” https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/with-a-little-help-from-my-friends/?WT.mc_id=SA_TW_MB_NEWS. Accessed May 28, 2017.

5 Idil Mussa. CBC News. May 2, 2017. “Seniors in Ottawa look to co-housing to avoid isolation.” http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/seniors-in-ottawa-look-to-co-housing-to-avoid-isolation-as-they-age-1.4094267. Accessed May 28, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Expenses That Come With Caring

We spend our lives caring for others — at least if we’re lucky. One of the greatest treasures in life is having people, causes and pets to care for. Unfortunately, caring for others can have its challenges, including additional stress and financial burdens.

Sometimes we get so caught up in making money that we don’t pay attention to how much we spend. Some of the money we spend may not really register because we use it to take care of others’ needs; what we may deem to be a necessary expense certainly doesn’t feel like discretionary spending.

But spending is spending, and we all need to take a careful look at how much of our money we use on caring for others, or “care management.” These expenses could include the money we spend raising our children, or helping them out when they’re older and nearly independent, but still need extra cash now and then.

We also should consider the amount of money we spend on elder care, whether for ourselves or loved ones. One recent study found that it costs families more to care for a frail older adult than to raise a child in the first 17 years of life.1 Many families are taking care of seniors diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at home for as long as possible, given the increasing price tag of providing full-time care.2  Some insurance products, such as life insurance and annuities, provide various options you may want to considerto help cover the potential costs of some of these care needs. If you’d like to find out more, please give us a call toll-free at 1-888-272-1099. We’d be happy to discuss options based on your unique situation.

Charitable donations are also a care management item, and going forward, there may be a greater call for private donations if the government cuts the budget in areas like the cultural arts. There is also concern that reduced funding on the environment could have long-ranging impacts on care issues. For example, scientists note climate change can impact the spread of infectious diseases carried by animals and insects, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, Zika and dengue. Further, compromised water systems can lead to waterborne infections like cholera and other gastrointestinal conditions.3

To end on a brighter note, here’s a heartwarming story related to caring and making someone’s day. Students of White Bear Lake Area High School in Minnesota have an annual tradition of staging a runway march through a local senior center in their fancy dress on the way to prom night.4 Just imagine the post-march chats among seniors about their high school days! It’s an engaging idea that demonstrates it doesn’t take a lot of money to stage a caring moment between generations.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Howard Gleckman. Forbes. Jan. 18, 2017. “Families Spend More to Care for Their Aging Parents Than To Raise Their Kids.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2017/01/18/families-spend-more-to-care-for-their-aging-parents-than-to-raise-their-kids/#924f7e6f4a50. Accessed May 12, 2017.

2 Bruce Jaspen. Forbes. March 7, 2017. “Alzheimer’s Staggering $259B Cost Could Break Medicare.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2017/03/07/u-s-cost-of-alzheimers-eclipses-250-billion/#294c3f5471e5. Accessed May 12, 2017.

3 Peter Grinspoon. Harvard Medical School. March 29, 2017. “Our planet, ourselves: Climate change and health.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/planet-climate-change-health-2017032911481. Accessed May 12, 2017.
4 White Bear Press. May 10, 2017. “Students take a prom march through Cerenity Senior Care Center.” http://www.presspubs.com/white_bear/article_67400d02-35a8-11e7-b749-731700102e0f.html. Accessed May 12, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 AE06175072B