Making Friends, Strengthening Relationships

In the early days of childhood, we start picking up communication skills that are continually developed throughout our lives. We make close friends, stay in touch with them and make sure we’re there for the people we care about.

But during retirement, it may take more effort to maintain those friendships. It’s important to remember that while we don’t typically lose these skills, we might lose the motivation to use them. Here are a couple of good reasons to keep up those social connections in retirement:1

  • A study by the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Chicago found that highly social seniors had a 70 percent lower rate of cognitive decline compared to those who were less social.
  • Researchers at the University of Alabama Birmingham found that using the internet was associated with a 30 percent decrease in depressive symptoms.

As financial professionals, we work with retirees every day helping them create retirement income strategies using a variety of insurance products. We’ve seen firsthand how easy it is to become more isolated when you stop working. You might find that by attending a financial seminar or client workshop, you’ll meet people in the same situation as you. Even if you feel like your retirement income strategy is well-established, we encourage you to continue monitoring your finances and participate in events where you not only have the opportunity to learn, but to spend time with people who may share your same interests and concerns.

When pre-retirees were asked what they would miss most about not working anymore, 17 percent predicted they’d miss their daily social interactions. However, when actual retirees were asked what they missed most from work, that number doubled — 34 percent said they missed their social connections from work.2

Another thing that’s different about retirement is that you’re no longer competing for career opportunities, so priorities can change. Hobbies you might have pursued during your career, like golf and tennis, may have been important to expand your network. But retirement can be a time for careful reflection; recognize that your energy, health and financial resources may be more limited now, so it’s important to prioritize what you want to do irrespective of anyone else’s expectations.3

By the same token, you may want to explore a deeper relationship with someone who’s been right there with you for decades: your spouse. Find out what your partner is like now. As you spend more time together, you might be surprised at how they’ve changed since you started working, and maintaining your relationship with your spouse can enhance your journey through retirement.4

New research has found that friendships in retirement may be even more valuable than family relationships. The quality of friendships proved to be a predictor of whether someone would acquire a chronic illness as they aged, whereas the quality of family relationships was not.5

Another interesting aspect of senior friendships is that women are more likely than men to make friends with others who are either much younger or much older. Researchers hypothesize this is because men tend to bond over activities, while women create more of an emotional connection — they don’t have to plan an event to nurture their relationships.6

One reason this phenomenon is particularly important is because seniors tend to lose similarly aged peers as they grow older. By establishing relationships with people from a younger generation, you’re more likely to maintain those friendships throughout your life.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 NEA. 2017. “The Value of Maintaining Social Connections Throughout Retirement.” https://www.neamb.com/the-value-of-maintaining-social-connections-throughout-retirement.htm. Accessed July 13, 2017.

2 Roger Whitney. The Retirement Answer Man. March 6, 2017. “One thing to do now to improve your social life in retirement.” http://rogerwhitney.com/social-life-in-retirement/. Accessed July 13, 2017.

3 Margaret Manning. Sixty & Me. 2016. “How to make friends as an adult in 4 simple steps.” http://sixtyandme.com/how-to-make-friends-as-an-adult-in-4-simple-steps/. Accessed July 13, 2017.

4 Emily Brandon. U.S. News & World Report. May 22, 2017. “7 Tips to Maintain Social Connections in Retirement.” https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/aging/articles/2017-05-22/7-tips-to-maintain-social-connections-in-retirement. Accessed July 13, 2017.

5 Susie Neilson. New York Magazine. June 16, 2017. “In Old Age, Friendships Might Matter Even More Than Family.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/06/in-old-age-friends-might-matter-even-more-than-family.html. Accessed July 13, 2017.

6 Verena von Pfetten. New York Magazine. May 24, 2017. “When Your Best Friend Is Younger than Your Daughter.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/05/why-cross-generational-female-friendships-are-on-the-rise.html. Accessed July 13, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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The Future of Globalization

There was a time, at the end of the 20th century, when globalization was celebrated. We became more connected with the rest of the world. We could communicate and share information in real time without cost, nations benefited from strong imports and exports, and companies could improve their bottom lines by utilizing lower-cost suppliers and workers throughout the world.

These days, perhaps not so much. Globalization has become a target for both opportunity and opposition, largely responsible for higher unemployment in developed nations and the protectionism movement. While exposure to different cultures, values and beliefs offers benefits, there is revitalized interest in intra-country government spending on infrastructure and employment.1

It’s easy to see why the topic of globalization would be divisive: what looks like a threat to some looks like opportunity to others. However, no matter what perspective you have, we are here for you. Let us help you stay focused on your long-term retirement income goals, regardless of global and local economic events.

It is likely that, moving forward, globalization will be downplayed but not eliminated. Rather, at least one observer purports that countries, including the U.S., may expend more effort and resources on “regionalization” with neighboring countries.2

One negative consequence of globalization, combined with the 2007-2009 recession, was higher unemployment in the U.S. This unfortunate circumstance hit young people particularly hard.3 But interestingly, the phenomenon of young adults moving back home with their parents also is characteristic of a global trend. According to one report, the following percentages represent 15- to 29-year-olds who live with their parents in various countries:4

  • Italy, 80.6%
  • Greece, 76.3%
  • Slovak Republic, 76.2%
  • Spain, 73.6%
  • Canada, 30.9%
  • Denmark, 34.3%
  • Sweden, 35.1%
  • United States, 32.1%5

On one hand, globalization has served to generate more jobs in certain disciplines. The phenomenon is, and will most likely continue to be, responsible for the growth of jobs for market research analysts, interpreters and translators, cartographers and customer service representatives.6

On the other hand, regardless of how many jobs renegotiated trade agreements may bring back to America, most authorities agree there won’t be nearly as many traditional manufacturing jobs as in the past. Since much assembly line work is now automated, the manufacturing jobs of the future are more likely to require technology degrees with IT skills and knowledge.7

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

 1 Sebastian Mallaby. International Monetary Fund. December 2016. “Finance and Development: Globalization Resets.” Vol. 53, No. 4. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2016/12/mallaby.htm. Accessed Feb. 27, 2017.

2 Jonathan Web. Forbes. Dec. 21, 2016. “2017 Will Be a Year of Regionalization, Not

Deglobalization.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/jwebb/2016/12/21/2017-will-be-a-year-of-regionalization-not-deglobalization/print/. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

3 Alex Gray. World Economic Forum. Nov. 11, 2016. “Still living with your parents? You’re not alone.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/why-do-so-many-young-adults-still-live-with-their-parents-in-these-countries. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

4 Ibid.

5 Drew Desilver. Pew Research. May 24, 2016. “In the U.S. and abroad, more young adults are living with their parents.” http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/05/24/in-the-u-s-and-abroad-more-young-adults-are-living-with-their-parents/. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

6 Rob Sentz. Forbes. Sep. 27, 2016. “Three Jobs That Are Growing Because of Globalization.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/emsi/2016/09/27/three-jobs-that-are-growing-because-of-globalization/#66d3c499648c. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

7 Scott Simon. NPR. Dec. 10, 2016. “Economist Says Manufacturing Job Loss Driven by Technology, Not Globalization.” http://www.npr.org/2016/12/10/505079140/economist-says-manufacturing-job-loss-driven-by-advancing-technology-not-globali. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Take a Look at Life Insurance

Middle-aged adults have a plethora of middle-aged financial priorities. It’s hard to even call them priorities because each one is important; it’s just a matter of spreading the money you have across a variety of different needs.

In fact, a typical mid-life checking account might include payouts for a mortgage, college tuition, a savings account, an IRA, a life insurance policy, and a long-term care insurance policy — and that’s not even including the 401(k) contribution that is taken out of a paycheck before it gets deposited.

If you struggle with trying to figure out which financial priorities are most important or how to allocate a portion of your retirement savings among the many insurance product options, we can help. In fact, there are insurance products that can help with multiple priorities so you don’t have to spread your assets so thin.

Take life insurance, for example. There are many different kinds, and one of the main differences is between term and whole life. With a term policy, you purchase a death benefit amount and determine how long you want to hold the policy; it doesn’t pay out anything unless the owner passes away during the term. Whole life features a cash value account, which, over time, can build up a balance you can access, if needed.1

First and foremost, life insurance is there to help take care of your loved ones if you pass away. While many employers provide some life insurance coverage for employees, it may not be enough to avoid the long-term hardship of that loss of income. However, less than 40 percent of Americans have an interest in life insurance at all. It actually comes in seventh in terms of most people’s financial priorities.2

While a term life policy offers a death benefit for the selected term, a whole life policy can provide a death benefit that covers your entire life, as long as you keep paying the premiums. It’s worth mentioning that older policies may actually mature when the policy owner turns 100 and will pay out the death benefit while he or she is still alive. Newer policies, however, extend to a maximum age of 121.3

A whole life policy also offers certain tax advantages. While premiums may not be tax deductible, the cash value grows tax deferred, and distributions through the use of policy loans are generally tax free. The cash value can be accessed if the owner needs emergency funds or money to supplement his or her retirement income, or it can even be used to pay the annual premiums on the policy.4 This is all in addition to the death benefit. Please note that withdrawals or policy loans of any type may reduce available cash values and death benefits and may cause the policy to lapse, or affect guarantees against lapse. Additional premium payments may be required to keep the policy in force.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Amy Danise. NerdWallet. Jan. 5, 2017. “Life Insurance Explained in (Exactly) 250 Words.” https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/life-insurance-explained-250-words/. Accessed Feb. 6, 2017.

2 BestLifeRates.org. Dec. 28, 2016. “2015 Life Insurance Statistics and Facts.” https://www.bestliferates.org/blog/2015-life-insurance-statistics-and-facts/. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.

3 Michael Kitces. Nerd’s Eye View. March 2, 2016. “The Age-100 Tax Problem With Outliving the End of Life Insurance Mortality Tables.” https://www.kitces.com/blog/outliving-the-end-of-life-insurance-mortality-tables-the-age-100-tax-problem-when-life-insurance-expires/. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.

4 Amy Bell. Investopedia. Aug. 21, 2014. “6 Ways To Capture The Cash Value In Life Insurance.” http://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/082114/6-ways-capture-cash-value-life-insurance.asp. Accessed Feb. 24, 2017.

 Life insurance policies are contracts between you and an insurance company. Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. It is not, however, intended to provide specific legal or tax advice and cannot be used to avoid tax penalties or to promote, market or recommend any tax plan or arrangement. You are encouraged to consult your personal tax advisor or attorney.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Will Bank Changes Lead to Withdrawal From Human Interaction?

The investment banking struggles that contributed to the 2008 recession prompted stronger regulations for the finance industry. Unfortunately, some of the rules created to keep the larger banks in check also impacted smaller community banks, which have suffered as a result.1

However, the Trump administration’s goal to cut regulations by 70 percent to 80 percent in various industries could have an impact on banks of all sizes.2 This is just one more anticipated change for a banking industry that was already poised for substantial shifts.

Some experts project bank tellers may soon be replaced by more cost-efficient artificial intelligence,3 and e-banking is expected to displace as many as one-third of brick-and-mortar branches in the next decade.4

While technology, and possibly even artificial intelligence, certainly has its place in the financial world, it’s unlikely to entirely replace the necessity for human assessment, guidance and recommendations. One reason is that it’s important to trust the person who is helping you work toward your retirement income goals. As financial professionals, that’s something we strive to provide for our clients. Please feel free to contact us to discuss how we can help you create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit your needs and objectives.

Of course, it’s still important to embrace technology, with the hope that companies go about it the right way. Another concern as technology becomes more prevalent is the battle over private data. In recent years, many apps and websites have encouraged consumers to input financial data regarding bank and credit card accounts to help manage their money.

Banks have started pushing back to restrict sharing of this kind of data with technology companies, but with the growing political trend toward deregulation, the sale and purchase of personal financial data may soon become more common.5

 It’s important to be aware of financial regulations and how they can help protect consumers. If you have questions about your rights concerning bank accounts, credit cards or mortgages, you can check out the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s fact sheet for answers to frequently asked questions.6

Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

 1Joyce M. Rosenberg. The Morning Call. Feb. 8, 2017. “Community Banks Hopeful as Lawmakers Target Financial Rules.” http://www.mcall.com/business/finance/mc-community-banks-hopeful-as-lawmakers-target-financial-rules-20170208-story.html. Accessed April 28, 2017.

2 Moira Vetter. Forbes. Jan. 31, 2017. “Saving Community Banks and Their Borrowers by Gutting Regulation.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/moiravetter/2017/01/31/saving-community-banks-and-their-borrowers-by-gutting-regulation/#60f6848672fe. Accessed March 28, 2017.

3 Luke Graham. CNBC. March 17, 2016. “Man vs Machine: A.I. Could Put You out of a Job.” http://www.cnbc.com/2016/03/17/man-vs-machine-ai-could-put-you-out-of-a-job.html. Accessed April 18, 2017.

4 MarketWatch. March 28, 2017. “Why the Bank of the Future Will Look Like an Apple Store.” http://www.marketwatch.com/video/sectorwatch/why-the-bank-of-the-future-will-look-like-an-apple-store/109B928E-1BA3-4DFB-8ABD-D0E43FB95B72.html. Accessed April 28, 2017.

5 Nathaniel Popper. The New York Times. March 23, 2017. “Banks and Tech Firms Battle Over Something Akin to Gold: Your Data.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/23/business/dealbook/banks-and-tech-firms-battle-over-something-akin-to-gold-your-data.html. Accessed March 28, 2017.

6 FDIC. Winter 2017. “From the FDIC Inbox: Our Answers to Common Financial Questions.” https://www.fdic.gov/consumers/consumer/news/cnwin17/commonquestions.html. Accessed March 28, 2017.

 This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Potential Reasons to Put the Retirement Countdown on Hold

Retirement is still something most people look forward to, but over the years, some of the reasons for anticipation have dwindled. During the industrial age, more people worked jobs requiring manual labor that were hard on the body.

By mid-century, many rank-and-file workers could look forward to a pension waiting for them upon retirement. Workers simply had to accumulate enough credits to retire knowing that a pension would provide income for the rest of their lives.

Now, physically demanding jobs are more of a rarity for pre-retirees, and modern-day ergonomic training is available to help ease the aches and pains of the daily grind. Pensions are also more uncommon, giving way to employee-contribution retirement vehicles like 401(k)s. Instead of looking forward to retiring, working longer can enable employees to save and invest longer.1

Workers today understand they may have to provide for a substantially greater share of their retirement income thanks to longer average lifespans. There’s also the possibility retirement could last multiple decades, and some retirees might miss the daily intellectual and social engagement a job provides.

This makes retirement income planning different than, say, college planning. When saving for a child’s education, parents have the advantage of knowing when the student will go to college and generally how many years he or she will be there. The “when” and “how long” are unknown factors when it comes to retirement.

As financial professionals, these are the types of variables we help address when advising clients. It is important to have the experience of helping clients make financial decisions and contingency plans throughout their retirement — experience we can use to guide the financial strategies we help our clients create every day.

Here are some other reasons today’s workers may be inclined to keep working past the traditional retirement age:

Increase Savings

According to a recent survey, the most common financial reasons older employees work in retirement are to:2

  • Give their nest egg more time to grow (19%)
  • Earn “fun money” for discretionary purposes (31%)
  • Leave a better legacy to heirs or charities (6%)

Increase Social Security Benefit

Sometimes it’s necessary for retirees to start taking Social Security benefits early, but that doesn’t mean they can’t continue or go back to work; nor does it mean they necessarily lock into a lower benefit for life. If you earn more than $16,920 in 2017 while receiving benefits prior to full retirement age, Social Security will deduct one dollar in benefits for every two dollars in earnings above $16,920.3 However, once you reach full retirement age, your benefit will be increased to account for benefits withheld due to earlier earnings and working once you reach full retirement age doesn’t affect your benefits. The agency will also recalculate your benefit based on your “new” highest 35 years of annual earnings, which could increase your overall benefit.4

Company Benefits

Some seniors continue to work because their employer’s health insurance is better and less expensive than Medicare.5 Please note that even if you have coverage through a current or former employer, you may still need to make some important Medicare enrollment decisions.

Switch Jobs, Work Longer

Some people retire because they dislike their job. However, a new study revealed that when workers take the initiative to switch to a more enjoyable position say, in their 50s, they tend to work longer — increasing both their income potential and job satisfaction. That’s no small improvement on both fronts.6

Feel Valued

Retirees have been known to go back to their old jobs because they get bored. At least one retiree observed that returning to work in a part-time capacity not only led him to enjoy the job more, but he felt better valued by his employer.7 We all know that sometimes we don’t appreciate what we have until it’s gone, and that can certainly apply to employers.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Kim Blanton. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. May 25, 2017. “Fewer Older Americans Work Part-time.” http://squaredawayblog.bc.edu/squared-away/fewer-older-americans-work-part-time/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

2 Emily Brandon. U.S. News & World Report. Feb. 17, 2017. “8 Reasons to Work in Retirement.”

https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/planning-to-retire/articles/2017-02-17/8-reasons-to-work-in-retirement. Accessed July 10, 2017.

3 Social Security Administration. 2017. “Fact Sheet: 2017 Social Security Changes.” https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/factsheets/colafacts2017.pdf. Accessed Aug. 7, 2017.

4 ElderLawAnswers.com. April 1, 2016. “Incentives to Keep Working While You Collect Social Security.” https://www.elderlawanswers.com/incentives-to-keep-working-while-you-collect-social-security-15312. Accessed July 10, 2017.

5 Jean Chatsky. CNBC. Jan. 20, 2017. “Retirement doesn’t have to be the end: How working longer benefits you.” http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/20/retirement-doesnt-have-to-be-the-end-how-working-longer-benefits-you.html. Accessed July 10, 2017.

6 Kim Blanton. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. March 23, 2017. “The Benefits of Late-career Job Changes.” http://squaredawayblog.bc.edu/squared-away/the-benefits-of-late-career-job-changes/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

7 Kim Blanton. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. April 20, 2017. “A Californian’s ‘Retirement’ is Part-Time.” http://squaredawayblog.bc.edu/squared-away/a-californians-retirement-is-part-time/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

We are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Social Security and Medicare benefits. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Retirement: The New Status Symbol

A lack of savings among many U.S. households could mean a change in the perception of retirement. It used to be a foregone conclusion that once you were too old to work, you retired. That’s not always the case anymore.

More than a third of U.S. households in prime earning years or later have no retirement savings and no access to a traditional pension.1 It’s become increasingly uncommon for people to retire in their early 60s, and those who fail to plan ahead for their future retirement income needs could end up with a retirement lifestyle worse than the one they had while working.

This doesn’t mean these middle-aged households are broke. Retirement income planning may just not be a priority yet. No matter your age, it’s never too late to start building strategies so you can enjoy your post-working years, and as financial professionals, that’s what we’re here for.

It takes diligence and focus to create a retirement income plan. Dwight D. Eisenhower once said, “Plans are worthless, but planning is everything.”2 This reiterates the point that planning for retirement should be strategic and committed, while at the same time fluid and flexible. Nobody knows what will happen in the future, but we can help you create a retirement income strategy designed to help meet your specific goals.

It can be difficult in the moment, but turning your back on pricey, impulse purchases, such as an expensive car, an outdoor kitchen or backyard pool, can help improve the prospects of your retirement down the road. Many people with good credit can borrow money to purchase these things, but good credit doesn’t fund a long retirement.3

Some workers might argue it’s not worth giving up indulgences today for a better (and earlier) retirement lifestyle. It’s a matter of examining individual priorities. One grandmother did just that when her 8-year-old grandson asked if she would be around when he got married. She had to rethink her priorities for what it might take to accomplish that goal. This led to a stronger pursuit of healthier living, including wholesome food, daily exercise and supportive social connections.4

While it may sound daunting to put in the years of hard work it takes to reach retirement, in some ways long hours at the office is a status symbol of its own. In Italy, the leisure class is perceived to have a higher status than the working class. But in the United States, there’s a certain prestige associated with working long hours and constantly being busy.5

Some people work 70+ hour weeks, not to earn more money and buy more things, but because that is what the working elite do.6 While this may not be the way all people wish to align their priorities, it does offer the distinct advantage of being able to save more money for retirement. For some, retiring is the ultimate status symbol.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Stan Choe. The Denver Post. Nov. 18, 2016. “Easy retirement for Americans? It’s only for a privileged few.” http://www.denverpost.com/2016/11/17/easy-retirement-privileged-few/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

2 Jonathan Look. NextAvenue. June 23, 2017. “What I Did to Stop ‘Awfulizing’ Retirement.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2017/06/23/how-i-stopped-awfulizing-retirement/#1d5429451baf. Accessed July 10, 2017.

3 Holly Johnson. Club Thrifty. May 15, 2017. “My Plan to Achieve the Ultimate Status Symbol.” http://clubthrifty.com/my-plan-to-achieve-the-ultimate-status-symbol/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

4 Jane E. Brody. The New York Times. April 20, 2016. “Thriving at Age 70 and Beyond.” https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/25/thriving-at-age-70-and-beyond/. Accessed July 10, 2017.

5 Lisa Tolin. NBC News. April 3, 2017. “The Busy Trap: How Keeping Busy Became a Status Symbol.” https://www.nbcnews.com/better/careers/busy-trap-how-keeping-busy-became-status-symbol-n742051. Accessed July 10, 2017.

6 Ben Tarnoff. The Guardian. April 24, 2017. “The new status symbol: it’s not what you spend — it’s how hard you work.” https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/24/new-status-symbol-hard-work-spending-ceos. Accessed July 10, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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