The Psychology of Economics

Countries with a longstanding track record of economic stability and security tend to have the happiest citizens, reports journalist Dan Buettner, who has studied what makes people happy. Education and health care are two primary reasons why, combining to create an upwardly mobile lifecycle.1

Mothers with higher education levels tend to have fewer children, and those children tend to be healthier and more productive adults, Buettner says. In turn, they often become successful parents and make more well-informed voting decisions. This enables the next generation to make even higher social and economic gains.2

With this in mind, it’s worth considering how we can make education and health care more affordable within our own households. College tuition is expected to continue experiencing higher inflation levels than most other household expenses.3 Health insurance and medical inflation is expected to outpace overall economic inflation this year for the first time since 2010.4 If you’re looking for ways to help prepare for future health care and higher education costs for you and your loved ones, please set up a time to visit with us.

Another interesting, emerging economic trend is that of human workers versus automation. While we can debate the merits of cost savings versus human judgment, there’s an underlying theory that technology is not necessarily the key to future economic growth. In fact, in a departure from encouraging more students to study the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and math), there’s a new movement to better understand the drivers of human behavior and how we might interact with technology in the future.5

If you look at recent trends in consumer-driven technology, there is a discernible shift away from high-tech products and services. For example, independent bookstores and print books are experiencing a revival after years of competing with the rising popularity of online bookstores and eReaders.6 And, remarkably, instant-print cameras have become fashionable again and experienced a 30 percent growth in sales in 2017.7

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Knowledge@Wharton. March 2, 2018. “What Can We Learn from the World’s Happiest People?” http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/blue-zones-happiness/. Accessed May 18, 2018.

2 Ibid.

3 Venessa Wong. CNBC. March 17, 2017. “In 18 years, a college degree could cost about $500,000.” https://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/17/in-18-years-a-college-degree-could-cost-about-500000.html. Accessed June 7, 2018.

4 Fortune. Feb. 15, 2018. “Healthcare Prices to Outpace Inflation for the First Time Since 2010.” http://fortune.com/2018/02/15/healthcare-prices/. Accessed May 18, 2018.

5 Shon Burton. MarketWatch. May 31, 2018. “Opinion: Coding skills won’t save your job – but the humanities will.” https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coding-skills-wont-save-your-job-but-the-humanities-will-2018-05-17. Accessed May 18, 2018.

6 Alex Preston. The Guardian. May 14, 2018. “How real books have trumped ebooks.” https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/may/14/how-real-books-trumped-ebooks-publishing-revival. Accessed June 4, 2018.

7 Chaim Pikarski. Twice. Feb. 20, 2018. “What’s driving the instant photo revival?” https://www.twice.com/blog/whats-driving-instant-print-photo-revival. Accessed May 18, 2018.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Family Business Considerations

Family businesses that manage to survive generation after generation leave not only a family legacy, but also the potential for tremendous wealth. For example, Arkansas-based Walmart is presently the largest business in the world in terms of revenue, earning more than $485 billion in 2017. In 1992, founder Sam Walton passed away and left his retail empire in the hands of seven heirs.1

Presently, the Walton family business outranks the wealth of the Koch Industries energy group, which is the second-largest privately owned company. Next in line in terms of individual wealth of business founders are Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Bill Gates (Microsoft) and Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway).2

These are just samples of the scope of wealth an entrepreneur can amass. However, most small business owners do well just to keep their heads above water. For those who would like to pass their business on to family members, there are basic business management strategies to keep in mind.3 If we can help you develop an insurance strategy to help protect your business, your key executive staff or your legacy, please give us a call.

On a day-to-day basis, successful family-owned entities generally follow some well-honed principles to keep family politics out of the business. For example, the patriarch and his four daughters who run the six-generation family-owned business D.G. Yuengling & Son Inc. have many varying opinions. To keep the business humming, they agree that it’s OK to disagree: “Diversity of opinion is what keeps family businesses strong and spurs collaboration.”4

It’s also a good idea to keep family and business separate. This means scheduling regular, in-office staff meetings so that family dinners can focus on just that — family. It’s important, too, that everyone has distinct roles and responsibilities. It’s difficult enough when duties overlap among workers, but in a family business this can lead to an all-out sibling brawl. When jobs and job titles are doled out to family members based on their natural strengths and interests, each employee can take ownership and be held accountable, as well as enjoy the pride and satisfaction for their individual contributions.5

For some families, entering the family business may take time. Even beyond a formal education, it may be important to first seek non-family job experience before “boomeranging” back to the fold. This scenario worked well for the three generations that run Cleaver Farm and Home — a building-supply distributor in Kansas. The business has managed to expand as each generation of family members took charge. For the current generation of brothers, launching their own career paths allowed them to return to their family roots and give their own children the sort of childhood they enjoyed.6

Bear in mind, too, that younger generations can bring new skill sets to the family business.

For example, a 17-year-old prodigy whose family has owned a metalworking company since the late Middle Ages has introduced technology to the fold. Anton Klingspor added exponential growth in his family’s business through various technological tools like LinkedIn Lead Builder and Facebook Workplace to improve team collaboration and communication.7

As a business grows larger and more complex, the family may need to look outside the fold for specific skills and experience. It’s important to engage knowledgeable professionals and establish formal business and family governance systems to help manage risks and enjoy a more sustainable foundation for future success.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Lianna Brinded. Quartz. May 14, 2018. “The richest family in the world beat the Koch brothers, Bezos, Gates, and Buffett.” https://qz.com/1276872/the-richest-people-in-the-world-walton-family-koch-brothers-bill-gates-jeff-bezos-warren-buffett/. Accessed May 28, 2018.

2 Ibid.

Hilary Sheinbaum. Forbes. April 30, 2018. “How The 4 Yuengling Sisters Manage The Family Business.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/hilarysheinbaum/2018/04/30/how-4-sisters-manage-the-family-business-and-still-get-along-and-you-can-too/#198c9d0262ca. Accessed May 28, 2018.

4 Ibid.

5 Amy George. Inc. Jan. 17, 2018. “How to Build a Family Business That Lasts for Generations, According to Bravo TV Star Tabatha Coffey.” https://www.inc.com/amy-george/how-to-build-a-family-business-that-lasts-for-generations-according-to-bravo-tv-star-tabatha-coffey.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

6 Raney Rapp. Farm Talk. May 15, 2018. “Cleaver Farm and Home celebrates three generations of family business.” http://www.farmtalknewspaper.com/news/cleaver-farm-and-home-celebrates-three-generations-of-family-business/article_7796c170-584b-11e8-8ed6-27bc3ee8f20b.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

7 John White. Inc. Sept. 7, 2017. “How This 17-Year-Old Used an Entrepreneurial Mindset to Grow His Family Business to $300-Million.” https://www.inc.com/john-white/lessons-from-a-gen-zer-on-how-to-grow-a-200-year-o.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

8 Marleen Dielemen. Forbes. May 25, 2018. “4 Types Of Family Businesses You’ll See In Asia And How To Govern Each Effectively.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nusbusinessschool/2018/05/25/4-types-of-family-businesses-youll-see-in-asia-and-how-to-govern-each-effectively/#5147434e659f. Accessed May 28, 2018.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

 We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference. 

Various Types of “Economies”

As recently as five years ago, few people had heard of emerging businesses like Airbnb and Uber that allow proprietors to share their personal residences and cars to generate income. This business model is now commonly referred to as the “sharing economy.” 1

However, just as capitalism morphs, so does the concept of sharing. For example, some Uber drivers actually lease an upscale car to charge higher fares that compete with luxury driving services.2

The Great Recession played a hand in encouraging unemployed workers to find innovative sources of income when jobs were scarce, and the sharing economy has been seen as influential in our overall economy’s recovery. It’s worth considering how we can better prepare ourselves for potential economic declines via job innovation, vigilant savings habits and protecting a portion of our retirement assets through guaranteed insurance products. If you’d like help devising a strategy using a variety of insurance products to help you work toward your long-term retirement income goals, please call us to schedule a meeting.

In addition to the sharing economy, today’s world is home to a wide array of economic varieties, including:

Sharing Economy

As mentioned, this model focuses on sharing or renting under-utilized assets. One of the primary concerns with this model is trusting others to take care of your personal assets. Some proprietors require an upfront deposit to help defray the cost of breakage or stolen goods. Insurance companies also have gotten into this business by developing policies for reimbursement.3

On-Demand Economy

This model focuses on providing goods and services on an as-needed basis. For example, in situations where a short-term rental is cheaper than buying — such as owning a car in a large metropolitan city — it can be more cost effective and convenient to use Uber transportation rather than own a car. This is true in expensive cities including New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and others, particularly when including expenses like gas and insurance. 4

Peer Economy

This economic model is based on the creation of products, delivery of services, funding and more by peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. These peer-lending platforms can help bolster economic progress, particularly in a rising interest-rate environment. For example, a small business seeking capital may be able to use an online P2P lending platform that matches borrowers to lenders. This can help a business owner acquire a less expensive loan more quickly than through a traditional financial institution.5

Crowd Economy

The crowd economy enlists the larger population or a subset to generate funding, information, resources and more. This particularly interesting phenomenon has infinite applications. For example, the city of Akron, Ohio, is providing CPR training to the general public in hopes that crowd-sourcing certain emergency service skills will lead to more victims getting immediate help until paramedics arrive.6 Crowd-sourcing also is a good way to find undiscovered talent. Instead of hiring an advertising agency to produce promotional artwork for an annual film festival, the organizers may hold an open competition for the public, tapping local artists whose talent may otherwise go unnoticed.7

Statistics indicate that the sharing economy and its various iterations are producing big revenues. A recent U.S. study found that on-demand workers generated more than $110 billion in the 15 largest metropolitan areas, including New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 April Rinne. World Economic Forum. Dec. 13, 2017. “What exactly is the sharing economy?” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/12/when-is-sharing-not-really-sharing/. Accessed June 2, 2018.

Ibid.

Matthew Wall. BBC News. June 1, 2018. “’I bought my mum a flat just by renting out my camera kit.’” https://www.bbc.com/news/business-44301183. Accessed June 2, 2018.

4 Megan Rose Dickey. TechCrunch.com. May 30, 2018. “Here’s where it’s cheaper to take an Uber than to own a car.” https://techcrunch.com/2018/05/30/heres-where-its-cheaper-to-take-an-uber-than-to-own-a-car/. Accessed June 2, 2018.

5 Craig Asano and Michael King. The Globe and Mail. May 30, 2018. “Peer-to-peer lending will help small businesses stay afloat.” https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/commentary/article-peer-to-peer-lending-will-help-small-businesses-stay-afloat/. Accessed June 2, 2018.

6 Doug Livingston. Akron Beacon Journal. May 31, 2018. “Akron is ‘crowd-sourcing’ CPR.” https://www.ohio.com/akron/news/akron-is-crowd-sourcing-cpr. Accessed June 2, 2018.

7 Michael Beiermeister. WBKB11.com. June 1, 2018. “Thunder Bay Film Society Crowdsourcing Cover Art for 2018 Sunrise 45 Film Festival.” http://www.wbkb11.com/thunder-bay-film-society-crowdsourcing-cover-art-for-2018-sunrise-45-film-festival. Accessed June 2, 2018.

8 Benjamin Mann. JD Supra. May 24, 2018. “The Gigs Get Bigger: Recent Data Shows the On-Demand Economy is Growing Into New Areas.” https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/the-gigs-get-bigger-recent-data-shows-85361/. Accessed June 2, 2018.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products including annuities are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.