Consider Having a Backup Plan

When looking ahead in anticipation of Social Security benefits, many people expect to wait until an average age of 66 to make a claim.1

However, Nationwide Retirement Institute’s fifth annual Social Security survey found many retirees start drawing Social Security at the earliest possible age of 622 — frequently the result of being laid off or health issues.

Thirty-six percent of respondents reported health problems got in the way of living the retirement they expected, and of those, 80 percent say health problems occurred as many as five or more years earlier than expected.3

This tells us something we already know but are constantly reminded of: Life does not always go as planned. Many financial professionals tell their clients one of the most effective ways to help ensure enough income throughout retirement is to continue working through their 60s. This may not be preferable, but it’s an option.

Others may plan to work longer but end up retiring for reasons beyond their control. It’s good to have a contingency plan. As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement income strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. Give us a call if you’re interested in finding out more.

It’s important to have a backup plan because there are many challenges for people working longer. For example, as jobs move further into technology, artificial intelligence and automation, new job skills are constantly required. It’s good to challenge the brain, but young college graduates typically have a firmer grasp on today and tomorrow’s technology — it’s a steep learning curve.4

A Washington Post article recently referred to the “gray ceiling.” As women have faced the “glass ceiling” as an obstacle to career advancement, age discrimination is sometimes manifested in the hiring, continued employment, development and advancement of older workers.5

Fortunately, recent workforce trends have made it easier for older workers to continue earning income past traditional retirement age. Many employers have embraced the work model of the “gig economy,” staffing up (and down) as needed with independent contractors. Older workers have proven to be well-suited for this type of employment due to their laser-like experience in certain roles, reliability and stability. A recent study suggests older white-collar professionals are driving the growing demand for gig workers among businesses in certain industries.6

While employers may embrace the gig economy to add and drop staff as needed, remember workers can do the same. Establishing yourself as a freelancer or independent contractor gives you the freedom to work as much or as little as needed.7 You can take off a month to go on vacation, or six months to fly south for the winter. You can also take on work only when you have big bills coming up, like homeowner’s insurance or property taxes.

A 2017 survey found one-third of future retirees are planning part-time work to provide at least 25 percent of their household income. Besides income, many gig workers ages 51 to 70 say a primary reason for freelancing is simply to stay active in retirement.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Nationwide Retirement Institute. April 2018. “Social Security 5th Annual Consumer Survey.” https://nationwidefinancial.com/media/pdf/NFM-17422AO.pdf. Accessed May 10, 2018.

2 Ibid.

3 Ibid.

4 James Manyika, Susan Lund, Michael Chui, Jacques Bughin, Jonathan Woetzel, Parul Batra, Ryan Ko and Saurabh Sanghvi. McKinsey Global Institute. November 2017. “What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages.” https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-organizations-and-work/what-the-future-of-work-will-mean-for-jobs-skills-and-wages#part%205. Accessed May 1, 2018.

5 Susan Williams. Booming Encore. March 2018. “Older Workers Watch Your Head – Breaking Through the Gray Ceiling.” http://www.boomingencore.com/older-workers-watch-head-breaking-gray-ceiling/. Accessed May 1, 2018.

6 Valerie Bolden-Barrett. HR Dive. Oct. 3, 2017. “Older workers — not millennials — are driving the gig economy.” https://www.hrdive.com/news/older-workers-not-millennials-are-driving-the-gig-economy/506349/. Accessed May 1, 2018.

7 Elaine Pofeldt. Forbes. Aug. 30, 2017. “Why Older Workers Are Embracing the Gig Economy.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/elainepofeldt/2017/08/30/why-older-workers-are-embracing-the-gig-economy/#642f904a42ce. Accessed May 1, 2018.

Ibid.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Medicare News

Earlier this year, Congress passed a last-minute budget deal that included provisions affecting Medicare benefits. Specifically, one provision will permit certain therapies to continue beyond the previous caps, subject to conditions. All therapy (physical, speech and occupational) must continue to be classified as “reasonable and necessary to treat the individual’s illness or injury.” 1

There had been ambiguity in the past as to whether Medicare would continue paying for sessions without measurable improvement. Now, however, therapy sessions may continue per the provider’s recommendation. Retroactive for this year, once therapy billing has reached $2,010 (about 20 sessions at $100 per visit), a provider must add an extra billing code to ensure payment. However, if total expenses subsequently pass a $3,000 threshold, they may be subject to medical reviews and audits.2

The federal budget agreement also accelerated the share-cost reduction during the so-called “doughnut hole” period in Medicare drug plans. Starting one year earlier — in 2019 — Medicare beneficiaries will pay 25 percent (instead of 35 percent) of drug expenses once they reach the stated annual limit (currently $3,750 in 2018).3

Medicare rules are always changing. It’s a lot like trying to make retirement planning decisions throughout your career — the bar is a moving target. One potential solution is to over-plan and overfund your share of expected health care expenses in retirement. If you’re looking for ways to help plan for possible increased health care expenses in the future, contact us.  We’d be happy to discuss your options based on your unique situation.

In April, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final ruling with updates for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans to provide more choices. Specifically, the rule expands the definition of “primarily health-related” benefits to cover products and services not considered direct medical treatments. Examples include air conditioners for people with asthma, healthy groceries, rides to medical appointments and home-delivered meals. Paid benefits also may include home modifications for mobility and balance, such as installing a wheelchair ramp or bathroom grab bars. Plans may offer benefits to help pay home aides who help with dressing, eating and other personal, daily-living care. MA plans must submit their bids for CMS approval by June 4 to begin offering these benefits in 2019.4

The new CMS rule also includes initiatives to address the national prescription opioid epidemic. Specifically, Medicare Part D plans now limit new opioid prescriptions for acute pain management to no more than a seven-day supply. The Overutilization Monitoring System (OMS) is expanding, increasing pharmacist accountability for patients already taking opioids.5

The CMS rule is part of a hardline approach to combating the opioid crisis. The White House has established a Safer Prescribing Plan initiative with specific goals that include cutting nationwide opioid prescription fills by one-third within three years.6

Content created by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Judith Graham. Kaiser Health News. March 29, 2018. “Scrutinizing Medicare Coverage For Physical, Occupational And Speech Therapy.” https://khn.org/news/scrutinizing-medicare-coverage-for-physical-occupational-and-speech-therapy/. Accessed May 4, 2018.

Ibid.

3 Susan Jaffe. Kaiser Health News. March 14, 2018. “Lifting Therapy Caps Is A Load Off Medicare Patients’ Shoulders.” https://khn.org/news/lifting-therapy-caps-proves-a-load-off-medicare-patients-shoulders/. Accessed May 4, 2018.

4 Bruce Japsen. Forbes. April 5, 2018. “How Trump’s New Medicare Rules Boost Amazon And Walmart.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2018/04/05/how-trumps-new-medicare-rules-boost-amazon-and-walmart/#600a42d6786c. Accessed May 4, 2018.

CMS. Fact Sheets. April 2, 2018. “2019 Medicare Advantage and Part D Rate Announcement and Call Letter.” https://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Fact-sheets/2018-Fact-sheets-items/2018-04-02-2.html. Accessed May 4, 2018.

6 The White House. Fact Sheets. March 19, 2018. “President Donald J. Trump’s Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand.” https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trumps-initiative-stop-opioid-abuse-reduce-drug-supply-demand/. Accessed May 4, 2018.

We are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Medicare. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Money Saving Tips

Reining in Impulse Purchases

Try as we may to be responsible, almost all of us end up spending money frivolously at one point or another. It’s good to recognize this and perhaps set aside money in your budget for discretionary purchases. However, on a day-to-day basis, it’s important to remain vigilant about spending habits and be aware of when those purchase impulses are likely to hit. The following are some tips to help you stay on track.1

  • Plan meals for the week, including what nights it would be most convenient for your schedule to dine out or pick up takeout. Break out your favorite slow cooker recipe and freeze the leftovers so you always have a meal on hand. Maintain a garden to grow fresh herbs and produce.
  • Don’t buy more than you plan to eat — with no more than one additional meal of leftovers. Too often, we think a large dish will last us all week, but we forget that we’ll get tired of eating it. Be realistic, and don’t waste money on food you may end up throwing away.
  • Don’t fool yourself into thinking that an impulse purchase is a reward. If you’re working toward a goal, budget a treat for yourself once you achieve it. That’s a reward. If you find something you suddenly can’t live without, don’t dream up some reason why you deserve to buy it. That’s a justification.
  • Don’t wait until you’re living well within your means to start saving and/or investing in a retirement account. Saving a little today can yield far better results than waiting to save more, years down the road — for some people that day never comes. Just tighten the belt a little more and start saving today. You may even feel good enough about the move that you don’t miss the money in your daily budget.
  • Don’t engage in “retail therapy” to make yourself feel better. A brisk walk in nature can yield the same results at far less cost.
  • Review your bank and credit card statements. Check to make sure you don’t have any incorrect charges, fraudulent purchases or penalty fees. In today’s environment of computer hacking, these things are far more common and can happen to anyone.
  • Don’t try to keep up with the Joneses. Establish your own goals and don’t let friends’ and neighbors’ new purchases distract you. When you try to keep up with others, you’re less likely to meet your own goals.

1 Nancy L. Anderson. June 22, 2016. “10 Expensive Habits You Can, And Should, Break Today.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyanderson/2016/06/22/10-money-habits-you-need-to-break-today/#5255d64c31e8. Accessed Dec. 7, 2017.

Music Plays Instrumental Role in Healing Ailments

Hearing a familiar song from a happy period in your life, such as childhood, can instantly make you feel joyful. It’s as if you’re right back there — toe tapping, head bopping and singing along. Just as with our sight, smell and taste senses, positive auditory memories can enhance mood and transport us back to a happier time.

The power of music has led researchers to study various applications of music therapy to help people overcome the pain of health conditions, emotional challenges and even the cognitive decline that often accompanies old age.1

It’s not enough to believe we will all grow old gracefully. This usually doesn’t happen without planning. A big part of planning for retirement isn’t just how to provide enough income for the rest of our life, but how to help ensure we still enjoy a high quality of life no matter our age.

As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives; just give us a call. As for creating a plan to help enhance quality of life, consider some of these music therapy applications.

Music therapy is now a board-certified health profession. With approximately 7,500 practitioners throughout the country, the practice has become prevalent in nursing homes and hospices. The American Music Therapy Association reports about 10 percent of musical therapists work with terminally ill patients in a new discipline called end-of-life music therapy.2

 A growing body of research indicates music therapy can help improve cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.3 It also can be used to aid in stress and pain management, memory enhancement, communication and physical rehabilitation.4

Further, the discipline has been found to help people with psychiatric problems, such as depression, trauma and schizophrenia. Music can help calm patients as well as help them process emotions, trauma and grief.5

Interestingly, the military has used forms of music therapy since the post-World War I era. Trained musical therapists use it as a tool to help wounded, injured or ill soldiers express their thoughts nonverbally. Research also shows music can be effective at increasing neuroplasticity in the brain, which is an important role in helping veterans address symptoms of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries.6

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Sharon Otterman. The New York Times. Jan. 15, 2018. “Music Therapy Offers an End-of-Life Grace Note.” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/15/nyregion/music-therapy-nursing-home-hospice.html. Accessed April 13, 2018.

2 Ibid.

3 Sherry Christiansen. Alzheimer’s Universe. July 24, 2017. “Quick Alzheimer’s Prevention Pearl: Studies Show Music Improves Cognition in People with Alzheimer’s Disease.” https://www.alzu.org/blog/2017/07/24/how-music-helps-with-alzheimers-prevention/. Accessed April 18, 2018.

4 American Music Therapy Association. 2018. “What is Music Therapy?” https://www.musictherapy.org. Accessed April 13, 2018.

5 Molly Warren. National Alliance on Mental Illness. Dec. 19, 2016. “The Impact of Music Therapy on Mental Health.” https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/December-2016/The-Impact-of-Music-Therapy-on-Mental-Health. Accessed April 18, 2018.

6 Frank Otto. Drexel University News Blog. March 20, 2018. “3 Things to Keep in Mind About Music Therapy in the Military.” https://newsblog.drexel.edu/2018/03/20/3-things-to-keep-in-mind-about-music-therapy-in-the-military/. Accessed April 13, 2018.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Best Places to Live in Retirement

Many retirees believe the best place to live in retirement is right in their own home. Let’s explore some of the “best places” where that home might be located and what it might look like.

It’s worth noting that the retirement experience varies widely. Some people have the money to relocate or buy a second home. Some people have plenty of retirement funds but choose to remain where they are. Come talk to us if you’d like help in creating a retirement income plan to assist you with figuring out what you may be able to afford.

According to a study by U.S. News & World Report on the top states for people 65 and older, Colorado is the best place in America to spend your retirement years. The study evaluated which states are most effective at helping retirees meet their health care, financial and community involvement needs.1

If you have a specific retirement haven in mind, be sure to do some research about it. For health care services, for example, U.S. News publishes a guide to the best hospitals with a searchable database. To learn about a locale’s cost of living, consider the Council for Community and Economic Research’s Cost of Living Index. To get a feel for an area’s year-round climate, check out the interactive climate data tools at the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information.2

Relocating after retirement can be difficult for some people, especially those with close friends and family ties to an area. If this is a concern for you, consider a short-distance move. Perhaps move to a nearby town that has less hustle and bustle, and more outdoor and cultural activities. If your motivation is to downsize, you may even be able to do that in your own community. In this case, you can get rid of the big house and accompanying maintenance chores and expenses, but stay close to family and friends.

Consider where you might be able to access personal help as you age, and the best way to procure that help. For example, you could relocate to a neighborhood near a nursing or medical school, and hire a student to help you if needed. If you have an extra bedroom, consider offering free or low-cost accommodations in exchange for personal aid. Even when we don’t need help with health care needs, as we age it never hurts to have someone we know and trust around to help maintain the house and lawn, drive or run errands, or just check in for conversation.

Think long term – not what your health is like right now, but what it could be like 20 years from now. In other words, having stairs may increase your chances of a fall. They also will be difficult to use if mobility is an issue. For some, the solution may be to buy a single-story home with the idea of avoiding those potential problems.

Another option to consider may be to sell your home and rent a smaller home. This could allow a retiree to pocket equity from the home sale and keep expenses low enough for current income sources. Renting also may eliminate the risk of a large maintenance cost or unanticipated repair.3

These are all long-term considerations people should think about with regard to the “best place to live in retirement.”

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 U.S. News & World Report. “Best States: Aging in America Ranking.” https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/rankings/aging. Accessed Nov. 21, 2017.

2 Melissa Phipps. The Balance. Sept. 4, 2017. “Find out Where You Should Retire.” https://www.thebalance.com/where-should-i-retire-2894254. Accessed Oct. 31, 2017.

3 Eric Petroff. Investopedia. March 17, 2017. “Retirement Living: Renting Vs. Home Ownership.” https://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/07/buy-rent.asp. Accessed Nov. 29, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Tips for Aches and Pains

As we grow older, many of us get wiser. We may become more comfortable in our own skin. We may get better at our jobs, have a more reliable income and begin to collect assets. We can gain a better appreciation of what’s important in life.

We also can lose things. Some of us lose a degree of innocence and idealism. Some miss their doggedness and fearlessness – while others may find they no longer have the thick hair of their younger years.

We also may have gains and experience losses in our finances. We learn that what goes up generally does come down, but then it can go up again. We develop financial strategies designed to help us weather economic ups and downs. If your life learnings summon the need to protect a portion of your retirement assets and help insure yourself against the risk of financial loss, give us a call. As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products, including annuities, to custom suit their needs and objectives.

We also may experience more physical aches and pains as we age. But there are coping mechanisms for these things, too.

For example, a lot of people these days are suffering from pain caused by our modern obsession with gadgets. We are hunched over computer keyboards and smartphones, putting strain on the head and neck. Experts say it helps to take lots of breaks, get outdoors, and do hand and neck stretches. Experience tells us that moderation in all things is key; this is also true for gadgetry.1

Some pain may be controlled through alternative methods. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, a division of the National Institutes of Health, reports there is growing evidence that acupuncture, hypnosis, massage, spinal manipulation and yoga may help manage some chronic conditions. Be sure to check with your health care provider before trying any of these methods, however, to make sure they won’t put your health or safety at risk.2

And then there are the effects of emotional pain. In recent months, many people have lost their homes, family and friends to hurricane winds, flooding, fire and earthquakes. It’s been a tough time even for those fortunate enough to survive. Some of the tactics recommended to help cope with this type of pain include committing to a routine to help get your life back on track, unplugging from news sources so you can get out of the disaster frame of mind for a while and adjusting expectations going forward.3

We may not always be able to recover the things we lose, but we can find comfort in recognizing and appreciating what we still have.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 The Daily Star. Sept. 2, 2017. “Is a modern lifestyle giving you aches and pains? 5 expert tips for healthier pain management.” http://www.thedailystar.net/health/5-expert-tips-healthier-pain-management-backpain-1457293. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.

2 National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. September 2016. “Chronic Pain: In Depth.” https://nccih.nih.gov/health/pain/chronic.htm. Accessed Oct. 16, 2017.

3 Paige Smith. Huffington Post. Sept. 20, 2017. “7 Tips for How to Cope If You’re Rebuilding After a Natural Disaster.” http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/cope-rebuilding-natural-disaster_us_59c2a020e4b0186c220775c6. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products including annuities are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Working Longer

Ah, the life questions we face. Young adults contemplate which college to attend and how that might affect their future. Women – and increasingly often, men – ponder whether to stay home and raise children, work or both. People contemplate job changes and relocations. And then, of course, a big question: When should I retire? One report observed that these days, about a third of adults ages 65 to 69 are continuing to work, and one-fifth of people 70 to 74 years old are working as well. The majority of them are working full time.1

If you get to make the decision to continue working all on your own, you are fortunate. Many people are forced to retire earlier than they’d like due to health reasons or because they are let go by their employer.2 If you can continue working, there can be many benefits, such as more time to save for retirement, employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, access to a social network, intellectual engagement and a place to go every day where you feel needed and important.

These are all good reasons to work longer. But whether you do so or not, you’re going to need a well-thought-out retirement income strategy. Using a variety of insurance products, we can help you create a strategy designed to help you to live the kind of retirement you’ve worked hard for. Contact us today to get started on your retirement income strategy.

If you are planning to work longer, consider that you don’t necessarily have to keep your current job. If you like it, that’s great. But if not, you might be able to phase into another role at your company, work in a similar position at another company or even take a completely different job in another industry. As we get older, we sometimes reflect back on what we’ve done, or didn’t do, and what we would do differently. If you’ve always been interested in another field, find out what it would take to break into it. If you’d like more time to pursue a hobby, figure out if there’s a way to turn it into a career.3

For example, if you love football, consider announcing for games at a local high school, coaching or refereeing. Apply to be an intern in a different field, write movie reviews for your local newspaper or work in a friend’s shop. While these jobs may not pay all that well, they may pay more than the retirement alternative of no outside income. By stringing together a variety of paying and volunteer gigs, you not only can supplement your retirement income but pursue passions and hobbies, and create quite a busy and engaged retirement lifestyle.

If you’d like a different job that can potentially pay substantial income, consider becoming a real estate agent. Many mature adults have the right qualities for the role – they know their community and neighborhoods, have a broad network of local contacts, have experience buying and selling their own homes, and understand the concerns and issues of new buyers. Furthermore, real estate is a relatively easy field to enter, and you have a certain degree of flexibility so you can work as much as you need for your income requirements.4

Another flexible job in which you may be able to use your previous work experience is as a freelance writer. Whether writing for your local paper or industry trade journals, writing is something you can practice on your own time to improve without extra schooling or training.

The point is, you may enjoy working longer and benefit from all of the associated advantages. However, if you don’t want to continue working in your current job, your options aren’t limited. You have knowledge and experience to rely on, which, when you think about it, is a whole lot more than you had when you started your career.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 The American College of Financial Services. Aug. 2, 2017. “5 Things to Tell Clients about Working Past Retirement Age.” http://knowledge.theamericancollege.edu/blog/5-things-to-tell-clients-about-working-past-retirement-age. Accessed Sept. 11, 2017.
2 Marlene Y. Satter. BenefitsPRO. Dec. 4, 2015. “What is forcing workers to retire earlier than they planned?” http://www.benefitspro.com/2015/12/04/what-is-forcing-workers-to-retire-earlier-than-the. Accessed Sept. 29, 2017.
3 Robert Powell. USA Today. Feb. 27, 2017. “How to keep earning a paycheck in retirement.” https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/retirement/2017/02/27/how-keep-earning-paycheck-retirement/98266500/. Accessed Sept. 11, 2017.
4 Maryalene LaPonsie. US News & World Report. May 8, 2015. “Real Estate: The Ultimate Second Career for Seniors.” https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2015/05/08/real-estate-the-ultimate-second-career-for-seniors. Accessed Sept. 11, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Economic Growth Prospects for the Future

Are life-changing innovations a thing of the past in the United States? While today’s technology seems to advance in leaps and bounds, one economist believes it won’t change the fabric of the average American’s life the way inventions like electricity, indoor plumbing and the elevator did in the 20th century.1

Yes, the internet is an amazing resource, and smartphones are nearly ubiquitous, but in terms of economic growth and productivity, they have not contributed as much as you might expect. Social media and infinite sources of information actually may serve to reduce our productivity both at home and at work.2

Nearly everyone can think of ways innovations have increased productivity, whether it’s looking up information online rather than consulting the library or using modern kitchen appliances that make cooking prep and cleanup much easier. However, this increased technology and efficiency may not translate to any improvement in one’s financial situation. While technology and online tools can allow you to better monitor your finances, please feel free to contact us for help in assessing your current retirement income strategy. As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

Today, two of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S. are construction and computer systems design.3 While both of these disciplines certainly have the capacity to improve people’s lives and productivity, they are not likely to present the quantum leap of, say, refrigeration.

One industry poised for rapid growth is satellite manufacturing. While costly in its upstart, prices are likely to align with greater demand for navigation, transportation management, disaster management, military intelligence and telecommunication applications.4

Some say the advancement of automation will replace jobs, but proponents are quick to point out that automation can help the American workforce become more productive. Amazon is a good example of a company that has embraced automation yet continues to offer more new jobs.5

What’s interesting is that while we measure economic growth on a national scale, contributions are not balanced. Certain regions, states and metropolitan areas contribute more substantial gains to the U.S. growth rate than others. For example, the labor force in Massachusetts is currently growing at the fastest rate in the country, having added 300,000 more jobs in the past 10 years. This is primarily because the state is home to a variety of strong and growing industries such as health care, financial services, high-tech manufacturing and higher education.6

And while controversial in its mix of documented and undocumented workers, the Latino population is considered a major contributor to U.S. GDP. Between 2010 and 2015, the Latino workforce increased by about 2.5 million while non-Latino workers shrank by about 4,000. This may be explained in part by the willingness of this demographic to pursue a higher education. Latino college graduates grew by 40.6 percent in that same timeframe, compared to 13.6 percent for non-Latinos.7 Economists tend to agree that the better educated the workforce, the higher a country’s economic growth prospects.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Knowledge@Wharton. Feb. 3, 2016. “Are America’s Best Years of Innovation Over?” http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/dazzling-yet-disappointing-why-u-s-growth-productivity-will-underperform-the-past/. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017.
2 Ibid
3 Mary Ellen Biery. Forbes. April 9, 2017. “The 10 Fastest-Growing Industries in The U.S.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/sageworks/2017/04/09/the-10-fastest-growing-industries-in-the-u-s/#56fdb5471ef2. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017.
4 Business Insider. Sept. 4, 2017. “Satellite Bus Market Worth $13.64 Billion USD by 2022.” http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Satellite-Bus-Market-Worth-13-64-Billion-USD-by-2022-1002306432. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017.
5 Steve Cousins. TechCrunch. Sept. 4, 2017. “Can robots help the U.S. get its economic mojo back?” https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/04/can-robots-help-the-u-s-get-its-economic-mojo-back/. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017.
6 Shira Schoenberg. MassLive.com. Sept. 4, 2017. “Study: Massachusetts has fastest growing labor force in US.” http://www.masslive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/09/study_massachusetts_has_fastes.html. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017.
7 Mark Bloomfield. The Hill. Aug. 14, 2017. “Look to Latinos to drive US economic growth.” http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/economy-budget/346464-latinos-could-lead-us-out-of-economic-malaise. Accessed Sept. 4, 2017. 

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Take a Look at Life Insurance

Middle-aged adults have a plethora of middle-aged financial priorities. It’s hard to even call them priorities because each one is important; it’s just a matter of spreading the money you have across a variety of different needs.

In fact, a typical mid-life checking account might include payouts for a mortgage, college tuition, a savings account, an IRA, a life insurance policy, and a long-term care insurance policy — and that’s not even including the 401(k) contribution that is taken out of a paycheck before it gets deposited.

If you struggle with trying to figure out which financial priorities are most important or how to allocate a portion of your retirement savings among the many insurance product options, we can help. In fact, there are insurance products that can help with multiple priorities so you don’t have to spread your assets so thin.

Take life insurance, for example. There are many different kinds, and one of the main differences is between term and whole life. With a term policy, you purchase a death benefit amount and determine how long you want to hold the policy; it doesn’t pay out anything unless the owner passes away during the term. Whole life features a cash value account, which, over time, can build up a balance you can access, if needed.1

First and foremost, life insurance is there to help take care of your loved ones if you pass away. While many employers provide some life insurance coverage for employees, it may not be enough to avoid the long-term hardship of that loss of income. However, less than 40 percent of Americans have an interest in life insurance at all. It actually comes in seventh in terms of most people’s financial priorities.2

While a term life policy offers a death benefit for the selected term, a whole life policy can provide a death benefit that covers your entire life, as long as you keep paying the premiums. It’s worth mentioning that older policies may actually mature when the policy owner turns 100 and will pay out the death benefit while he or she is still alive. Newer policies, however, extend to a maximum age of 121.3

A whole life policy also offers certain tax advantages. While premiums may not be tax deductible, the cash value grows tax deferred, and distributions through the use of policy loans are generally tax free. The cash value can be accessed if the owner needs emergency funds or money to supplement his or her retirement income, or it can even be used to pay the annual premiums on the policy.4 This is all in addition to the death benefit. Please note that withdrawals or policy loans of any type may reduce available cash values and death benefits and may cause the policy to lapse, or affect guarantees against lapse. Additional premium payments may be required to keep the policy in force.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Amy Danise. NerdWallet. Jan. 5, 2017. “Life Insurance Explained in (Exactly) 250 Words.” https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/life-insurance-explained-250-words/. Accessed Feb. 6, 2017.

2 BestLifeRates.org. Dec. 28, 2016. “2015 Life Insurance Statistics and Facts.” https://www.bestliferates.org/blog/2015-life-insurance-statistics-and-facts/. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.

3 Michael Kitces. Nerd’s Eye View. March 2, 2016. “The Age-100 Tax Problem With Outliving the End of Life Insurance Mortality Tables.” https://www.kitces.com/blog/outliving-the-end-of-life-insurance-mortality-tables-the-age-100-tax-problem-when-life-insurance-expires/. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.

4 Amy Bell. Investopedia. Aug. 21, 2014. “6 Ways To Capture The Cash Value In Life Insurance.” http://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/082114/6-ways-capture-cash-value-life-insurance.asp. Accessed Feb. 24, 2017.

 Life insurance policies are contracts between you and an insurance company. Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. It is not, however, intended to provide specific legal or tax advice and cannot be used to avoid tax penalties or to promote, market or recommend any tax plan or arrangement. You are encouraged to consult your personal tax advisor or attorney.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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A 100-Year Lifespan: Ways to Help Increase Enjoyment

The average life expectancy of a baby born in the U.S. today is 80 years. However, this prediction assumes prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of birth stay the same throughout a person’s life.1

In reality, patterns of mortality improve over time thanks to discoveries and innovations in nutrition and medical science. If you extrapolate the data to represent the same pace of mortality improvement in the future, people up to age 30 today can reasonably expect to live to an average age of 100.2

However, just as important as how long you live is how well you live. Below are some ideas on steps you can take to help ensure you enjoy your retirement years.

One way to prepare for an active retirement is to engage in work-life balance early in life. Many people work long hours and don’t take enough vacation time. Over time, this can lead to mental and physical exhaustion. If we don’t take care of ourselves when we’re younger, we have less chance of enjoying a higher quality of life when we’re older.

Or, consider your perspective – are you pursuing your own happiness or trying to find meaning in life? Studies have demonstrated that the pursuit of happiness may not be as good for our well-being as the pursuit of a more meaningful life. In other words, being directed and motivated by valued life goals, which often can take more effort and cause more stress, may be more rewarding. To illustrate, consider the rewards of raising children versus embarking on a series of exotic vacations. Researchers have found that, over the long term, people who pursued more meaning and purpose were more deeply satisfied than those chasing temporary happiness.3

Another study even found a correlation between greater engagement in day-to-day life with a higher degree of financial success, possibly because this type of person tends to place a high value on pursuing long-term goals.4

Exercise is also key. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 32 percent of older adults do not engage in any physical exercise. Understandably, people who don’t prioritize exercise when they’re younger are not likely do so in retirement, so it’s important to make it a habit early on.5

It’s also important to choose activities you can continue as you age. Classes growing in popularity among the over-50 set include dance, strength training, gentle yoga, “gentle stretch,” “Pilates fusion,” ballet barre and tai chi. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, programs for older adults are among the top 20 fitness trends for 2017.6

Retirees may be familiar with the SilverSneakers program, celebrating its 25th anniversary. The program is free for adults over age 65 who are covered by Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplement and many other plans.7

In addition to things you should do to enrich a 100-year life, there are things that would make it less enjoyable. One of those things is dementia. While there are many risk factors for dementia, including age, alcohol use, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and genetics, a recent study discovered a few other common triggers that can increase the risk of cognitive decline:8

  • Taking anticholinergic drugs, which includes over-the-counter sleep aids, sedating allergy meds (e.g., Benadryl), sedating pain meds (e.g., Tylenol PM) and prescription meds such as some antidepressants and urinary incontinence treatments. The study also found that once people stop taking these meds, their risk dropped back to normal levels.
  • Lack of vitamin D
  • Heartburn medications with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as Prilosec and Prevacid (complete list here)

We can help you prepare for longer life expectancies by utilizing insurance products within your overall retirement income strategy. Please feel free to contact us to discuss how we can help.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Peter Vanham. World Economic Forum. Sept. 15, 2016. “You’ll Probably Live to Be 100. Here’s How You Need To Prepare For It.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/09/you-ll-probably-live-to-be-100-here-s-how-you-need-to-prepare-for-it/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Emily Esfahani Smith and Jennifer Aaker. New York Magazine. Dec. 30, 2016. “In 2017, Pursue Meaning Instead of Happiness.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/12/in-2017-pursue-meaning-instead-of-happiness.html. Accessed March 3, 2017.

4 Drake Baer. New York Magazine. Jan. 4, 2017. “Living with Purpose Yields a Longer Life and Higher Income.” http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/01/living-with-purpose-yields-a-longer-life-and-higher-income.html. Accessed March 3, 2017.

5 Lynn Langway. Next Avenue. Jan. 30, 2017. “Boomers Took Fitness and Made It Their Own.” http://www.nextavenue.org/boomers-fitness-trends/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

6 Ibid.

7 Ibid.

8 Beth Levine. Next Avenue. May 25, 2016. “3 Surprising Things That Raise Your Dementia Risk.” http://www.nextavenue.org/3-surprising-things-raise-dementia-risk/. Accessed March 3, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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