Consider Having a Backup Plan

When looking ahead in anticipation of Social Security benefits, many people expect to wait until an average age of 66 to make a claim.1

However, Nationwide Retirement Institute’s fifth annual Social Security survey found many retirees start drawing Social Security at the earliest possible age of 622 — frequently the result of being laid off or health issues.

Thirty-six percent of respondents reported health problems got in the way of living the retirement they expected, and of those, 80 percent say health problems occurred as many as five or more years earlier than expected.3

This tells us something we already know but are constantly reminded of: Life does not always go as planned. Many financial professionals tell their clients one of the most effective ways to help ensure enough income throughout retirement is to continue working through their 60s. This may not be preferable, but it’s an option.

Others may plan to work longer but end up retiring for reasons beyond their control. It’s good to have a contingency plan. As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement income strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. Give us a call if you’re interested in finding out more.

It’s important to have a backup plan because there are many challenges for people working longer. For example, as jobs move further into technology, artificial intelligence and automation, new job skills are constantly required. It’s good to challenge the brain, but young college graduates typically have a firmer grasp on today and tomorrow’s technology — it’s a steep learning curve.4

A Washington Post article recently referred to the “gray ceiling.” As women have faced the “glass ceiling” as an obstacle to career advancement, age discrimination is sometimes manifested in the hiring, continued employment, development and advancement of older workers.5

Fortunately, recent workforce trends have made it easier for older workers to continue earning income past traditional retirement age. Many employers have embraced the work model of the “gig economy,” staffing up (and down) as needed with independent contractors. Older workers have proven to be well-suited for this type of employment due to their laser-like experience in certain roles, reliability and stability. A recent study suggests older white-collar professionals are driving the growing demand for gig workers among businesses in certain industries.6

While employers may embrace the gig economy to add and drop staff as needed, remember workers can do the same. Establishing yourself as a freelancer or independent contractor gives you the freedom to work as much or as little as needed.7 You can take off a month to go on vacation, or six months to fly south for the winter. You can also take on work only when you have big bills coming up, like homeowner’s insurance or property taxes.

A 2017 survey found one-third of future retirees are planning part-time work to provide at least 25 percent of their household income. Besides income, many gig workers ages 51 to 70 say a primary reason for freelancing is simply to stay active in retirement.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Nationwide Retirement Institute. April 2018. “Social Security 5th Annual Consumer Survey.” https://nationwidefinancial.com/media/pdf/NFM-17422AO.pdf. Accessed May 10, 2018.

2 Ibid.

3 Ibid.

4 James Manyika, Susan Lund, Michael Chui, Jacques Bughin, Jonathan Woetzel, Parul Batra, Ryan Ko and Saurabh Sanghvi. McKinsey Global Institute. November 2017. “What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages.” https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-organizations-and-work/what-the-future-of-work-will-mean-for-jobs-skills-and-wages#part%205. Accessed May 1, 2018.

5 Susan Williams. Booming Encore. March 2018. “Older Workers Watch Your Head – Breaking Through the Gray Ceiling.” http://www.boomingencore.com/older-workers-watch-head-breaking-gray-ceiling/. Accessed May 1, 2018.

6 Valerie Bolden-Barrett. HR Dive. Oct. 3, 2017. “Older workers — not millennials — are driving the gig economy.” https://www.hrdive.com/news/older-workers-not-millennials-are-driving-the-gig-economy/506349/. Accessed May 1, 2018.

7 Elaine Pofeldt. Forbes. Aug. 30, 2017. “Why Older Workers Are Embracing the Gig Economy.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/elainepofeldt/2017/08/30/why-older-workers-are-embracing-the-gig-economy/#642f904a42ce. Accessed May 1, 2018.

Ibid.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Family Business Considerations

Family businesses that manage to survive generation after generation leave not only a family legacy, but also the potential for tremendous wealth. For example, Arkansas-based Walmart is presently the largest business in the world in terms of revenue, earning more than $485 billion in 2017. In 1992, founder Sam Walton passed away and left his retail empire in the hands of seven heirs.1

Presently, the Walton family business outranks the wealth of the Koch Industries energy group, which is the second-largest privately owned company. Next in line in terms of individual wealth of business founders are Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Bill Gates (Microsoft) and Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway).2

These are just samples of the scope of wealth an entrepreneur can amass. However, most small business owners do well just to keep their heads above water. For those who would like to pass their business on to family members, there are basic business management strategies to keep in mind.3 If we can help you develop an insurance strategy to help protect your business, your key executive staff or your legacy, please give us a call.

On a day-to-day basis, successful family-owned entities generally follow some well-honed principles to keep family politics out of the business. For example, the patriarch and his four daughters who run the six-generation family-owned business D.G. Yuengling & Son Inc. have many varying opinions. To keep the business humming, they agree that it’s OK to disagree: “Diversity of opinion is what keeps family businesses strong and spurs collaboration.”4

It’s also a good idea to keep family and business separate. This means scheduling regular, in-office staff meetings so that family dinners can focus on just that — family. It’s important, too, that everyone has distinct roles and responsibilities. It’s difficult enough when duties overlap among workers, but in a family business this can lead to an all-out sibling brawl. When jobs and job titles are doled out to family members based on their natural strengths and interests, each employee can take ownership and be held accountable, as well as enjoy the pride and satisfaction for their individual contributions.5

For some families, entering the family business may take time. Even beyond a formal education, it may be important to first seek non-family job experience before “boomeranging” back to the fold. This scenario worked well for the three generations that run Cleaver Farm and Home — a building-supply distributor in Kansas. The business has managed to expand as each generation of family members took charge. For the current generation of brothers, launching their own career paths allowed them to return to their family roots and give their own children the sort of childhood they enjoyed.6

Bear in mind, too, that younger generations can bring new skill sets to the family business.

For example, a 17-year-old prodigy whose family has owned a metalworking company since the late Middle Ages has introduced technology to the fold. Anton Klingspor added exponential growth in his family’s business through various technological tools like LinkedIn Lead Builder and Facebook Workplace to improve team collaboration and communication.7

As a business grows larger and more complex, the family may need to look outside the fold for specific skills and experience. It’s important to engage knowledgeable professionals and establish formal business and family governance systems to help manage risks and enjoy a more sustainable foundation for future success.8

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Lianna Brinded. Quartz. May 14, 2018. “The richest family in the world beat the Koch brothers, Bezos, Gates, and Buffett.” https://qz.com/1276872/the-richest-people-in-the-world-walton-family-koch-brothers-bill-gates-jeff-bezos-warren-buffett/. Accessed May 28, 2018.

2 Ibid.

Hilary Sheinbaum. Forbes. April 30, 2018. “How The 4 Yuengling Sisters Manage The Family Business.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/hilarysheinbaum/2018/04/30/how-4-sisters-manage-the-family-business-and-still-get-along-and-you-can-too/#198c9d0262ca. Accessed May 28, 2018.

4 Ibid.

5 Amy George. Inc. Jan. 17, 2018. “How to Build a Family Business That Lasts for Generations, According to Bravo TV Star Tabatha Coffey.” https://www.inc.com/amy-george/how-to-build-a-family-business-that-lasts-for-generations-according-to-bravo-tv-star-tabatha-coffey.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

6 Raney Rapp. Farm Talk. May 15, 2018. “Cleaver Farm and Home celebrates three generations of family business.” http://www.farmtalknewspaper.com/news/cleaver-farm-and-home-celebrates-three-generations-of-family-business/article_7796c170-584b-11e8-8ed6-27bc3ee8f20b.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

7 John White. Inc. Sept. 7, 2017. “How This 17-Year-Old Used an Entrepreneurial Mindset to Grow His Family Business to $300-Million.” https://www.inc.com/john-white/lessons-from-a-gen-zer-on-how-to-grow-a-200-year-o.html. Accessed May 28, 2018.

8 Marleen Dielemen. Forbes. May 25, 2018. “4 Types Of Family Businesses You’ll See In Asia And How To Govern Each Effectively.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nusbusinessschool/2018/05/25/4-types-of-family-businesses-youll-see-in-asia-and-how-to-govern-each-effectively/#5147434e659f. Accessed May 28, 2018.

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

 We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference. 

Deducting Home-Loan Interest

Planning Tip

The new tax law still allows a deduction for interest on a home equity loan, line of credit or second mortgage as long as the loan is used to buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayer’s primary or second home. Specifically, the interest is deductible only if the loan meets all three of the following criteria:1

  • The debt is secured by the underlying residence
  • The total of the refinanced debt is not greater than the cost of the residence
  • The proceeds are used to improve or expand the residence

However, the applicable loan is subject to a new $750,000 debt limit ($375,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return). This limit applies to the combined total of loans used to buy, build or improve the taxpayer’s main home and second home. If you have an existing home equity loan that does not qualify under these three criteria, the interest may no longer be deducted.2

 The content provided in this newsletter is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. Neither our firm nor its agents or representatives may give tax advice. Be sure to speak with a qualified professional about your unique situation.

 1 IRS. Feb. 21, 2018. “Interest on Home Equity Loans Often Still Deductible Under New Law.” https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/interest-on-home-equity-loans-often-still-deductible-under-new-law. Accessed May 29, 2018.

2 Ibid.  

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

For Some Retirees, Home is Where the Debt is

Today’s pre-retirees and retirees tend to have far more debt than those in years past. In addition to factors like credit card payments and medical expenses, this generation is seeing the effects of higher home prices and easily obtained low down-payment mortgages in the early 2000s.1

Between 2003 and 2016, Americans 60 and older nearly tripled their household debt — composed of mortgages, home equity loans, auto loans, student loans and credit cards.2 According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, households headed by a person age 75 or older held an average debt load of $36,757 in 2016.3

If you’re still carrying a fair amount of debt and nearing retirement, we can help you review your household budget to help plan for a more confident retirement. Please give us a call if you’d like to schedule a meeting.

One of the challenges in the new tax law is the interest-cap deduction on mortgage loan payments, meaning homeowners with high mortgage balances may be required under the new law to deduct less mortgage interest. The mortgage limit on new homes purchased is $750,000, while the limit on mortgages purchased before Dec. 15, 2017, remains $1 million. These numbers are important if downsizing is part of your debt-reduction strategy.4

Another major contributor to debt is the rising cost of sending children to college. Of the 3.5 million Americans who owe an average of $24,000 in Parent PLUS student loan debt, about half of them are parents older than age 50. Worse yet, the number of parents with student loans is rising at a faster rate than students.5 Unfortunately, all those debt payments could be used to save for retirement.

The No. 1 reason individuals file for bankruptcy is medical debt.6 Whether nearing retirement or already there, unexpected health care costs can seriously curtail retirement funds. It’s a good idea to work with a financial professional to develop a strategy for paying potential health care costs down the road.

Content created by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Rebecca Moore. PlanAdvisor. Jan. 10, 2018. “Debt Causing Financial Vulnerability for Pre-Retirees.” https://www.planadviser.com/debt-causing-financial-vulnerability-pre-retirees/. Accessed May 11, 2018.

2 Michelle Singletary. The Washington Post. Feb. 26, 2018. “Should you retire your debt before retiring?” https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/get-there/wp/2018/02/26/should-you-retire-your-debt-before-retiring/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.d3d26dc8cda2. Accessed May 11, 2018.

3 Annie Nova. CNBC. May 9, 2018. “Almost half of Americans don’t expect to have enough money to retire comfortably — but there’s some good news.” https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/09/almost-half-of-americans-dont-expect-to-have-enough-money-to-retire-comfortably–but-theres-some-good-news.html. Accessed May 11, 2018.

4 Anthony P. Curatola. MarketWatch. May 10, 2018. “Watch for these pitfalls if you want to deduct mortgage interest under the new tax law.” https://www.marketwatch.com/story/watch-out-for-these-pitfalls-if-you-want-to-deduct-mortgage-interest-under-the-new-tax-law-2018-05-09. Accessed May 11, 2018.

5 Kathy A. Bolten. Des Moines Register. April 2, 2018. “Thousands of Iowa parents are going into debt to pay for their kids’ college (and they probably shouldn’t).” https://features.desmoinesregister.com/news/parent-plus-student-loans-college-debt/. Accessed May 11, 2018.

6 Sharon Epperson. CNBC. Nov. 16, 2017. “Don’t let surprise medical bills drain your retirement.” https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/15/dont-let-surprise-medical-bills-drain-your-retirement.html. Accessed May 11, 2018.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Generation Fun

When we talk about planning for retirement, we’re usually referring to financial objectives and income strategies. These things are important, but they’re not the only ways to adequately prepare for retirement. In addition to creating an income strategy, consider developing a specific plan for what you want to do — day in and day out — for a retirement that could last 20 to 30 years.

After all, knowing what you want to do in retirement can help put a number on how much money you’ll need to save. For example, a retiree with big travel plans will likely need a larger nest egg than someone cultivating a vegetable garden. Give us a call; we’d love to meet with you to discuss your specific goals and begin drafting a detailed retirement income strategy.

For many people, retirement is a time to do all the things they never had time to do before. Merrill Lynch found that people between ages 65 and 74 reported having more fun than any other age group. However, it’s easy to sink into daily routines that can lead to boredom and lethargy.1

To help maximize your enjoyment in retirement, plan to have a plan. For example, carve out time for your passions or develop a new interest. Get out of the house regularly to discover places you’ve always wanted to visit — a local museum or restaurant, a neighboring city or a far-flung exotic locale. The top criteria retirees use when seeking new adventures are the arts, fine dining, learning, volunteering, outdoor water activities, outdoor land activities and — in its own category — golf.2


1 William P. Barrett. Forbes. July 14, 2017. “25 Great Places To Follow Your Passions In Retirement In 2017.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/williampbarrett/2017/07/14/great-places-to-follow-your-passions-in-retirement-in-2017/#3d003f0c92df.

Accessed May 10, 2018.

Ibid.

Money Saving Tips

Reining in Impulse Purchases

Try as we may to be responsible, almost all of us end up spending money frivolously at one point or another. It’s good to recognize this and perhaps set aside money in your budget for discretionary purchases. However, on a day-to-day basis, it’s important to remain vigilant about spending habits and be aware of when those purchase impulses are likely to hit. The following are some tips to help you stay on track.1

  • Plan meals for the week, including what nights it would be most convenient for your schedule to dine out or pick up takeout. Break out your favorite slow cooker recipe and freeze the leftovers so you always have a meal on hand. Maintain a garden to grow fresh herbs and produce.
  • Don’t buy more than you plan to eat — with no more than one additional meal of leftovers. Too often, we think a large dish will last us all week, but we forget that we’ll get tired of eating it. Be realistic, and don’t waste money on food you may end up throwing away.
  • Don’t fool yourself into thinking that an impulse purchase is a reward. If you’re working toward a goal, budget a treat for yourself once you achieve it. That’s a reward. If you find something you suddenly can’t live without, don’t dream up some reason why you deserve to buy it. That’s a justification.
  • Don’t wait until you’re living well within your means to start saving and/or investing in a retirement account. Saving a little today can yield far better results than waiting to save more, years down the road — for some people that day never comes. Just tighten the belt a little more and start saving today. You may even feel good enough about the move that you don’t miss the money in your daily budget.
  • Don’t engage in “retail therapy” to make yourself feel better. A brisk walk in nature can yield the same results at far less cost.
  • Review your bank and credit card statements. Check to make sure you don’t have any incorrect charges, fraudulent purchases or penalty fees. In today’s environment of computer hacking, these things are far more common and can happen to anyone.
  • Don’t try to keep up with the Joneses. Establish your own goals and don’t let friends’ and neighbors’ new purchases distract you. When you try to keep up with others, you’re less likely to meet your own goals.

1 Nancy L. Anderson. June 22, 2016. “10 Expensive Habits You Can, And Should, Break Today.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyanderson/2016/06/22/10-money-habits-you-need-to-break-today/#5255d64c31e8. Accessed Dec. 7, 2017.

Strategies for Optimal Social Security Payouts

Social Security benefits are typically synonymous with retirement income. It would be inefficient to create a retirement plan without first estimating how much you will receive from the government.1 According to a 2018 report, Social Security benefits represent approximately:2

  • 33% of elderly income
  • 50% or more of income for about half of elderly married couples
  • At least 50% of income for 71% of elderly singles
  • At least 90% of income for 23% of married couples and 43% of singles

In a recent survey, more than half of pre-retirees said they expect Social Security to be their primary source of retirement income.3 With so many people relying on Social Security payouts, it makes sense to explore strategies to receive the largest possible distribution. In some cases, this could mean tapping into your personal investment portfolio to delay drawing Social Security.

If you’d like to discuss various insurance and investment strategies to help supplement part-time income or bridge the gap between retirement and Social Security, please come talk to us.

The earlier you start drawing benefits, the lower the payout will be — and your payout level is locked in for life (with the exception of periodic cost of living adjustments). Unfortunately, the most common age that people start taking benefits is the first year they are eligible. If possible, it often makes sense to wait longer so that benefits can accrue.4

If you can wait until age 70, benefits will earn an additional 8 percent a year past full retirement age for a maximum boost of up to 32 percent. Delayed retirement credits are technically accrued on a monthly basis, so even if you don’t wait until age 70, every month you delay past full retirement age will increase your payout.5

Delayed retirement credits also apply toward surviving spouse benefits. In other words, should you pass away before drawing benefits, your spouse will receive the amount you qualified for as of the month of your death.6

Social Security benefit strategies are complex, but considering the importance this income is to most retiree households, it’s a good idea to learn as much as possible to help optimize benefits for your particular situation. This Social Security quiz is a good place to start.7

Content provided by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Social Security Administration. 2018. “Retirement Estimator.” https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/retirement/estimator.html Accessed May 1, 2018.

2 Social Security Administration. 2018. “Fact Sheet.” https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/factsheets/basicfact-alt.pdf.

Accessed May 1, 2018.

Mary Beth Franklin. Investment News. April 25, 2018. “Future retirees expect Social Security to be main source of income.” http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20180425/BLOG05/180429953/future-retirees-expect-social-security-to-be-main-source-of-income. Accessed May 1, 2018.

Ray Martin. CBS News. April 30, 2018. “How to claim your Social Security benefits wisely.” https://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-to-claim-your-social-security-benefits-wisely/. Accessed May 1, 2018.

5 Rachel L. Sheedy. Kiplinger. February 2017. “Why Your First Social Security Check May Be Smaller Than Expected.” https://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T051-C000-S004-when-delayed-social-security-credits-get-delayed.html. May 1, 2018.

6 Laurence Kotlikoff. Forbes. April 27, 2018. “Ask Larry: ​​​​​​What If Either Of Us Dies Before 70?”

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kotlikoff/2018/04/27/ask-larry-%E2%80%8B%E2%80%8B%E2%80%8B%E2%80%8B%E2%80%8B%E2%80%8Bwhat-either-of-us-dies-before-70/#6f18b1ea4081. Accessed May 1, 2018.

Mary Kane. Kiplinger. April 18, 2018. “Do You Really Understand Social Security?” https://www.kiplinger.com/quiz/retirement/T051-S009-do-you-really-understand-social-security/index.html.

Accessed May 1, 2018.

We are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Social Security benefits. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Personal Productivity

Do you ever feel as if you don’t get enough done in a day? Many of us tend to do what we absolutely must, tackling easy tasks instead of launching into bigger projects or the pursuit of longer-term goals. In other words, we cook, clean, answer emails and catch up with the day’s news – but do we ever start that novel or the side business we’ve been considering?

One of the causes of poor productivity may be lack of a plan. Ben Franklin planned out everything he would do each day at what time, tracked in half-hour time blocks.1 In fact, studies have shown that writing a plan is an effective way of improving productivity. Further, writing out a plan by hand – as opposed to typing it on a computer or smartphone calendar – is even more effective. Apparently, it makes us feel more connected to the material because we use the frontal lobe of the brain for both writing and planning, as well as problem solving.2

According to a recent article in Inc. magazine, a few simple habits can help make us more productive. They include setting basic building blocks toward a goal, creating benchmarks for incremental success and using only essential tools – don’t spend a lot of time and money unnecessarily.3

Some of these tips are also worthwhile practices for retirement saving and budgeting. After all, it’s a good idea to have a strategy for retirement income – a written one is best. Focusing on small, regular savings can help you meet incremental goals, and making commonsense decisions about what you do and don’t need to spend money on in retirement can help reduce the amount of income you’ll need. If you’d like some more ideas on ways to help make your retirement savings more productive through the use of insurance products, please give us a call.

Sometimes all we need to make ourselves more productive is to take a break from the action. However, it’s best not to take a long one – just enough to distract your brain so it returns to the task re-energized. In that break, you could stand and stretch, complete a quick chore – like paying a bill online – or respond to a text or email.4 Other productivity boosters include taking a 20-minute power nap and spending some time outdoors – preferably in the sunshine.5

Bear in mind that productivity isn’t about how many hours there are in a day, but how well you use them. A new study out of the United Kingdom said the average worker would be more productive if he or she were expected to work only three hours a day. That’s because the average office worker is generally engaged in actual work for only that long – the rest of the day is spent checking social media, visiting news websites, chatting with coworkers, etc. If we weren’t expected to be at our job for a full eight hours – if we could leave as soon as we got “X” amount of work done – it’s easy to imagine that people would become a lot more productive in less time.6

If you’re retired, consider translating this idea into your usual day. Imagine that long-term task you want to accomplish is your job, and you have to be “at work” for a full hour each day. The rest of the day is all yours for everything else. Would you be more productive in that one hour?

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Amy Carleton. TheCut.com. Oct. 11, 2017. “The Centuries-Old Strategy That Turbocharged My Productivity.” https://www.thecut.com/2017/10/the-centuries-old-strategy-that-turbocharged-my-productivity.html?utm_campaign=sou&utm_source=tw&utm_medium=s1. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Julian Hayes II. Inc.com. Oct. 25, 2017. “These 5 Overlooked Habits Will Instantly Make You More Creative and Productive.” https://www.inc.com/julian-hayes-ii/5-simple-habits-that-will-immediately-boost-your-productivity.html. Accessed Oct. 25, 2017.

4 Richard Moy. Inc.com. Oct. 20, 2017. “A 5-Minute Routine to Jolt Your Productivity.” https://www.inc.com/the-muse/how-to-boost-energy-at-work-5-minute-routine.html. Accessed Oct. 25, 2017.

5 Stephanie Vozza. Fast Company. Oct. 12, 2015. “15 Habits That Will Totally Transform Your Productivity.” https://www.fastcompany.com/3051540/15-habits-that-will-totally-transform-your-productivit. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

6 Arielle Tschinkel. Hellogiggles.com. Sept. 28, 2017. “A new study shows that a 3-hour work day may be better for productivity.” https://hellogiggles.com/lifestyle/money-career/3-hour-work-day-productivity/. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Retirement Conversations: What Do You Do?

We spend a lifetime working, building a career, raising a family, etc. Then we retire, and some unsuspecting acquaintance asks, “What do you do?” It’s a whole new ballgame now.

This can be a difficult question for new retirees. Our gut instinct is to identify ourselves by our occupations — “I’m a lawyer,” I’m an office manager,” “a teacher” or a “stay-at-home mom.” When you spend that much time in one role, it becomes a part of who you are. But is that still who you are once you retire? Some people might say, “I used to be a lawyer.” After a while, they may get used to simply saying, “I’m retired.” Yet this process of figuring out how to respond may be directly correlated to how long it takes to figure out who we are in retirement.1

Some people spend years dreaming about what they’ll do when they retire, so they might answer, “I’m now an amateur golfer.” Or gardener. Or grandchild-babysitter. It’s worth taking some time to build a retirement identity for yourself; not just to answer that question, but to establish your own purpose for getting up in the morning. One of the keys to the retirement you desire is aligning your lifestyle goals with your retirement income.  Please feel free to contact us to discuss creating retirement strategies through the use of insurance products that can help you work toward your long-term retirement income goals.

A recent study conducted by Humana found that the more optimistic people are by nature, the younger they feel. In fact, the most optimistic retirees also rated high in areas of good health, getting enough sleep, feeling confident and overall happiness. The study concluded that working on a more positive attitude is important to retirees’ overall health and well-being.2

But what if you aren’t naturally optimistic? One tip for achieving optimism is to practice. Work on identifying negative thoughts and replacing them with positive ones. The general idea is to “fake it until you make it.”3

Researchers at Stanford University analyzed a longevity study of 60,000 diverse U.S. adults between 1990 and 2011 in areas such as demographics, medical history, physical exam and physical activity data. One of the more interesting findings was that people who perceived themselves as “a lot less active” than peers had a higher risk of death — regardless of how much they exercised or other health risk factors such as smoking or obesity. Apparently, it’s not just our health that matters, but also how we feel about ourselves.4

If we believe we are less active than everyone else — and are stressed and depressed about that — it can negatively impact our health. This is an important issue for physicians to consider, because warning about dangerous behaviors such as smoking, inactivity or overeating apparently can actually worsen the problem.5

Perhaps one way to foster optimism is to create a plan for how to spend your days. For example, start a new venture. It doesn’t matter if it’s for profit or not; the main incentive is to provide a purpose. Maybe follow up on a good idea that no one in your area is doing or find a need you can fulfill. When people retire, they often find they have time to do things that they never got to do before, and they also may have time to do things that need to get done — that no one else has time to do.

For the first time in history, there are about to be more people over age 65 than under age five.6 Furthermore, we have a shortage of care providers. Of course, not everyone will need a full-time caregiver; some may just need a little help — perhaps with remembering to turn off appliances or going to doctor appointments. Companies are currently looking at artificial intelligence for more ways — more gadgetry — to help address these issues and allow people to age longer at home.7

But for now, small, kind and oh-so-helpful gestures may be all some people need. Life is full of these types of opportunities — ways to feel good, help others and get the exercise we need without going to a gym. Here’s one idea: Some elderly people have a hard time getting their trash can to the curb for pickup, so perhaps that’s a volunteer job that provides purpose and exercise for a younger retiree while helping others.

Look around. See how you can contribute. And the next time someone asks you what you do, create yourself a brand-new identity title.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Joe Casey. Booming Encore. “Answering in Retirement: So, What Do You Do?” http://www.boomingencore.com/retirement-what-do-you-do. Accessed Nov. 13, 2017.

2 Humana. Oct. 4, 2017. “Survey: Sense of Optimism Linked to the Perceived Mental and Physical Health of Seniors.” http://press.humana.com/press-release/current-releases/survey-sense-optimism-linked-perceived-mental-and-physical-health-sen. Accessed Dec. 5, 2017.

3 Susan Williams. Booming Encore. “The Relationship Between Optimism, Health and Aging.” http://www.boomingencore.com/relationship-optimism-health-aging/. Accessed Nov. 13, 2017.

4 Monique Tello. Harvard Health Publishing. Aug. 14, 2017. “Mind over matter? How fit you think you are versus actual fitness.” https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/mind-over-matter-how-fit-you-think-you-are-versus-actual-fitness-2017081412282. Accessed Nov. 13, 2017.

5 Ibid.

6 Elena Holodny. Business Insider. May 16, 2016. “We’re about to see a mind-blowing demographic shift unprecedented in human history.” http://www.businessinsider.com/demographics-shift-first-time-in-human-history-2016-5. Accessed Dec. 5, 2017.

7 Ian C. Schafer. Software Development Times. Nov. 7, 2017. “IBM expands AI research to support an aging population.” https://sdtimes.com/ibm-expands-ai-research-support-aging-population/. Accessed Nov. 13, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Travel Tips

Anthony Melchiorri, the host of the Travel Channel show “Hotel Impossible,” says he prefers to stay in a roadside motel over a luxury hotel – as long as it has good online reviews. In his opinion, the mom and pop ownership model often leads to painstaking efforts for cleanliness, fresh flowers and a home-cooked meal – not to mention personal recommendations for uniquely local places to visit in the area.1

After all, the accommodation industry is all about hospitality, and hospitality is about personal service. It doesn’t get more personal than running your own business. We feel the same way about working with our clients. We know you want to talk to familiar people when you call for information. At the end of the day, we’re all looking for that extra touch, the human connection, something that sets service above the rest. Please contact us anytime. We are here to help you with your retirement income strategy questions.

This desire for the personal touch remains true whether you’re at home or traveling. In a recent interview, Mr. Melchiorri offered some interesting advice for planning a vacation. For example:2

  • If you’re booking a hotel, check out its most recent reviews online at sites like TripAdvisor and Yelp. Even large chains get bad reviews, and some of those roadside motels get charming It pays to check before you book.
  • While you may want to use one of those shop-and-compare websites to find a hotel, once you make a selection go to the hotel’s actual website to make your reservation. The hotel website is guaranteed to offer the lowest rate – Melchiorri says a website like Expedia is not allowed to have a lower rate than the hotel. In addition, when you book through a third party, it can be more difficult to get your money back.
  • Remember that hotels and motels are in the hospitality industry, and the good ones want to ensure you are pleased with your stay. Melchiorri encourages travelers to ask for things they want – an upgrade, a poolside room, to be upstairs or downstairs, bottled water or fresh flowers in their room. If hotel staff can accommodate you, they most likely will.
  • If you encounter a problem, he suggests you first make a polite complaint, then escalate to a more direct aggressive complaint, and finally, express your displeasure with a scathing online review.

One way to save money on accommodations is on parking. Many hotels charge for onsite parking or valet service. Consider downloading an app to your smartphone to help you find less expensive parking options. These apps look for parking based on your location and show the least expensive options, which can yield as much as 50 percent in savings. Other apps can find all available transportation options between your current location and your destination, so you can choose the most convenient with the best price.3

If you want to learn about the history of an area you’re visiting, check out local museum deals. Some places offer free entrance either on certain days or all the time. For example, the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. and nearly every museum in London offer free admittance year-round.4

If you’re traveling abroad, before you leave home, make copies of your passport and driver’s license; leave one with a friend and tuck another into your bag. It’s also a good idea to take photos of them on your smartphone and load them up to a password protected cloud storage site. Having copies of important travel documents can alleviate a lot of hassle if the originals are lost or stolen.5

You also may want to spread your cash in a few different places, such as your wallet, in zipper pockets and in your hotel safe. Should you lose your billfold or get robbed, you won’t be left totally without cash.6

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Beth J. Harpaz. Washington Times. Sept. 6, 2017. “Why ‘Hotel Impossible’ star likes a good roadside motel.” http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/sep/6/why-hotel-impossible-star-likes-a-good-roadside-mo/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS. Accessed Oct. 2, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Talia Avakian. Travel and Leisure. Sept. 30, 2017. “These 18 Easy Tips Can Save You a Fortune on Your Next Trip.” http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/save-money-while-traveling. Accessed Oct. 2, 2017.

4 Ibid.

5 Mike Shubic. Travelocity. Oct. 2, 2017. “12 Genius Travel Planning Tips.” https://www.travelocity.com/inspire/12-genius-travel-planning-tips/. Accessed Oct. 2, 2017.

6 Ibid.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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